Young Australian Actor Caleb McClure Stars in the film “The Legend of Ben Hall”

TV series Underbelly
Actors Matt Boesenberg (left), Caleb McClure (center) and Luke Ford (Right) on set of “Underbelly” shot by Brett Cox

Australian born actor Caleb McClure just wrapped production on writer-director Matthew Holmes’ film The Legend of Ben Hall, which is set in the 1800’s and based on true Australian historical events focusing on Bushranger Ben Hall and his gang of outlaws.

The film co-stars Callan McAuliffe (The Great Gatsby, Homeland), Andy McPhee (Saving Mr. Banks), and displays McClure’s emotional depth as a child actor. He plays a policeman’s son who is traumatized and impacted by Ben Hall’s unlawful ring, as his father is shot down and dies in his very arms. McClure’s character drives the narrative and demonstrates that, even though he is still in his early teens, he is an actor who’s well beyond his years in terms of emotional maturity.

“My role was intense at times with a lot of action and emotion so I had to be quick on my feet, and it was definitely physically challenging,” says the actor who also worked in freezing conditions while shooting on location in Victoria and New South Wales in Australia.

The Legend of Ben Hall is currently in post-production and set to be released in 2016. McClure adds, “Transforming into another era and becoming this character was great.”

Caleb McClure is no stranger to showcasing his impressive dramatic range and depicting characters in period pieces. In 2008, he starred in the sixth season of Australia’s Award Winning Television series Underbelly, entitled Underbelly: Squizzy, which was set in the early 1900’s and revolves around notorious Melbourne gangster Squizzy Taylor.

In 2011, McClure took on the leading role in the film Where Is Mum? where he played a child who conceals his HIV from his fellow classmates at school.

“I try to find something I can relate to or is challenging, and something that I can accomplish in a great way,” says the actor about choosing roles. 

Recently McClure tackled the AIDS ailment once more as he co-starred in Tim Conigrave’s bestselling memoir, turned film adaptation Holding the Man, where he played Tim’s younger brother, Nick Conigrave. Holding the Man focuses on the 15-year love affair of two gay men set during the AIDS epidemic in the 1980’s.

“I had to show a lot of emotion and be aggressive and upset,” says McClure.

In the film, which received rave reviews in Australia, McClure stars alongside Guy Pearce (Memento, LA Confidential, The Hurt Locker) as Tim and Nick’s father, Dick Conigrave, as well as film veteran and Oscar Winner Geoffrey Rush (Pirates of the Caribbean Trilogy, The King’s Speech, and Shine) who plays Tim’s acting teacher.

Like most actors who have reached pivotal success in their youth like, Leonardo Di Caprio or Tobey Maguire, McClure began building his resume when he was just a toddler. At the ripe age of four, the now dramatic actor started his career as a print model for Elle Magazine and within a few years landed his first acting gig at the age of eight.

From that point forward, McClure swiftly landed several roles from Where is Mum? A View from Below, I am Evangeline, and Underbelly. Now with over fifteen film roles under his belt there is no stopping this actor’s rocket career.

“I’m interested in whatever will carry me to the next level as an actor,” says McClure, and you can bet that audiences will continue to watch as this versatile young performer’s career flourishes.

You can find out more about Australian actor Caleb McClure through his IMDb Page: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm3899794/

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