Sound Engineer Josué Catalán Discusses Hit Singles and What Can Be Expected in 2018

To this day, somewhere just over 1,250 micro-genres of popular music have been named. They’ve played a huge role in helping to describe and classify different albums and songs, and in doing so, have allowed both listeners and musicians to easily identify and categorize their preferred musical styles.

Renowned sound engineer, Josué Catalán, has experience with mixing and mastering music from a multitude of genres. This versatile experience has aided in Catalán’s growth as an artist, which in recent years has contributed to the success of two major hit singles: Pegadito a Mi Piel and Cuando La Historia Cambie, both released in 2017. Furthermore, due to his vast practice, Catalán’s been able to isolate a few of his favorite genres to work within, too.

“I have two favorite genres of music,” Catalán informed, “POP and Jazz. I love how each one represents a world on its own, and I learn a lot every time I get to work on a POP or Jazz production.”

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Josué Catalán recording at Studio 57 Pro

The song Pegadito a Mi Piel, which Catalán mixed and mastered, is a song that falls within one of the sound engineer’s two favored genres: POP. Sung by Chilean POP artist Dani Ilabel and produced by Max Donoso and Manuel Burgos, Pegadito a Mi Piel translates to “Close to my skin,” and is a song of romance. It took Catalán a total of just three days to have the final product complete and ready to be delivered to TVN (Televisión Nacional de Chile) Records, the well-known label the single was signed by.

“The main challenge while mixing and mastering this particular song was finding a certain attitude to give the sound that could make it stand out from the typical romantic ballad,” Catalán explained. “I tried to impart some character by adding subtle distortion and delivered nuances that made the sound be forward and dynamic.”

Part of what makes Catalán so uniquely brilliant when it comes to his work is his fearlessness when it comes to taking risks with sound. Anyone can learn how to engineer, but it takes a truly exceptional kind of person, one who’s willing to gamble the possibility of failure, to obtain the attention-seeking type of success Catalán has proved himself more than capable of attaining. Producer Donoso supported this thought, stating, “Josué’s the person you go to because you know he’ll make your music sound better. Not only is he the kind of engineer that knows how to translate engineering into music, which makes him so easy to work with, but he’s also not afraid of taking musical/engineering risks. His mixes tend to bring an edge to projects that helps them to stand out among the ever-crowded universe of music productions.”

Such success also goes hand in hand with working amongst a team of talented individuals, who also happen to deeply care about professionalism and camaraderie within the workplace. Not only have Catalán, Donoso, and Ilabel worked as a unit on Pegadito a Mi Piel, but they’ve also collaborated on several tracks and albums together. “When you work with talented people who also care about teamwork, work ethics, and human relationships, it’s hard not to learn and see yourself grow. Working with Max has showed me that big challenges must be taken step by step and that nothing is impossible in terms of dreams and vision. He taught me to value simple things in music; an honest song will resonate better with the audience, and actually, that’s something one can even relate to life,” Catalán elaborated.

While Pegadito a Mi Piel was the first of songs that Catalán mixed and mastered to be aired on national television, it certainly wasn’t the last. In fact, some of the most notorious tracks the trio has worked on together have been featured on multiple shows of the main Chilean TV channel, TVN. It was, however, Pegadito a Mi Piel’s great success which opened new doors for young singer Ilabel. Not only was the single used as the main soundtrack for the 2017 soap opera La Colombiana starring Felipe Braun, Elizabeth Minotta, and María José Illanes, but it was also named one of the 50 most viral songs in Chile on Spotify for two weeks, ultimately reaching second place on the list.

In simple terms, as Catalán puts it, “A successful song can position an artist so that he or she can spark interest of the label or producers that are managing the artist.” And, this is exactly what the finished product Pegadito a Mi Piel did.

Currently, there is another Ilabel single that will also be mixed and mastered by Catalán in the works. While an official release date is still to be determined, one can remain on the lookout for the song as it is set to be titled Cuenta Conmigo (Count on Me). Ilabel’s latest single that was mixed and mastered by Catalán, Eres Mi Otra Mitad (You Are My Better Half), was released quite recently, and has been airing on TV for about three months now.

Branching out some from the familiar and favorited territory of the POP music genre, Catalán contributed to yet another hit single this past year: The Country-Rock single Cuando La Historia Cambie sung by the famed Jano Letelier.

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Josué Catalán recording Jano Letelier’s single Cuando La Historia Cambie

Cuando La Historia Cambie is a powerful song that speaks of the injustice and wracked government system in Chile. Elaborating on the subject he’s quite familiar with, Catalán explained, “Chile, because of the military dictatorship in the 70-80s, is one of the most “Neoliberal” countries in the world. Everything is private and the system encourages social and economic inequality. People have to wait six months to get an appointment with a doctor in the public system. Meanwhile, the private hospitals are like luxury hotels and are very expensive. Also, people are retiring with pensions not greater than 10% of their former income, and this is a system managed by private companies. And these are just a few examples of what is going on within the country.”

The compelling and fresh production of Cuando La Historia Cambie was recorded, mixed, and mastered by Catalán, and has been transmitted by several online radio stations, including as the Todos Junto Radio, as well as FM radios such as Radio Futuro, one of the largest Rock and Blues radio stations in all of Chile.

“The first time I heard Cuando LA Historia Cambie on Radio Futuro, I felt so proud and excited and was full of adrenaline. I am proud of having worked on delivering the powerful message of the song to tons of people through one of the biggest radio stations in the country,” Catalán reminisced.

Contributing to the overall production of the single was drummer Arturo Salinas, bass player Sebastian Cordova, and studio assistant Nicolas Moris.

Prior to entering the recording studio, the team had prepared the songs and all ideas, resulting in a smooth process of production.  The band was recorded live with all musicians playing at the same time, and the final mix of the song was listened to repeatedly until Catalán and Letelier were certain they’d achieved a flawless sound.

“Josue’s preparation, responsibility, good hearing, and good will to work makes him very good at what he does,” Letelier commented. Catalán’s great ear for sound quality and comprehensive talent for engineering was also noticed by several radio listeners; After Cuando La Historia Cambie first aired on a radio show, Catalán instantly received praising comments comparing the sound quality of Letelier’s song to various others of the same style that were aired among his on the station that day. Adding to her previous words, Letelier concluded, “When working with him, you can see that he is happy doing what he loves and puts his positive energy into the projects.”

Presently, Catalán has mixed two additional Jano Letelier singles that are set to be released in early 2018, along with an entire album that should see the light by mid 2018. “The new album is a fresh view of Chilean music based mainly on blues and rock. It serves as an example of the talent that we have in Chile and will bring many different topics to the table in a very honest and powerful way,” Catalán shared. “Jano’s vision of Chilean music is very unique yet very representative of the national scene. The whole process of working with him has been very educative.”

 

For more information on Josué Catalán, please visit: www.josuecatalan.com
To listen to Pegadito a Mi Piel, please visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-SzcAHUHek
To listen to Cuando La Historia Cambie, please visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6E3mIjDZBw

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Charlotte Chimes At the Top of Her Game in “One Eight Zero”

Well-known Australian actress Charlotte Chimes has recently wrapped a lead role in the film project “One Eight Zero”,opposite “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” actor, Rupert Raineri.

One would think that working with such high-profile talent in a highly-anticipated film would cause any actor nerves, but it was a process that Charlotte took in her stride. “The shoot was challenging, but well worth it. I got to learn how to ride a horse, and we shot some beautiful scenes in (Australia’s capital city), Canberra.”

In explaining why Charlotte was cast, the director and production team could not be more enthusiastic in highlighting that Charlotte was the only actress in Australia who could have played the lead role of Lucy. Director Denai Gracie was particularly favourable. Gracie is well-known in Australia for her film work and producing the award-winning film “Battle Ground” with “X-Men” star Tim Pocock. “Reviewing [Charlotte’s] previous work gave me such confidence in her ability to excel in the role, that I didn’t feel the need to audition her. She did not disappoint!!…Charlotte instinctively resonated with the character of Lucy, bringing the perfect blend of sincerity and authenticity to the role, and delivered a powerhouse performance.”

Charlotte’s role was not only the lead, but also represented an artistic challenge that gave her the opportunity to do detailed character work. The film, a coming-of-age story, completely revolves around Lucy’s character journey and therefore the film simply would not function were it not for Charlotte’s commanding, central performance. “After surviving a life altering accident Lucy must rebuild her life and establish what truly is valuable to her,” Charlotte explains with the eloquence expected of a leading actress. “It was important to me that she was portrayed as a multifaceted human being going through immense upheaval with grace, resilience and integrity.”

“One Eight Zero” represents one of many recent esteemed productions in which Charlotte plays a lead or critical role. For one, she recently stole the small-screen in her performance as Holly for horror anthology series, “Scary Endings,” produced by Strangler Films and John Fitzpatrick. Fitzpatrick is well known for his work on the long-running CW favorite, “Supernatural.”

“I feel incredibly blessed to have worked with such preeminent international producers – the experience on “Scary Endings” was a fun one. It’s not as scary shooting horror projects as it is watching them!”

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Charlotte having fun with producers and cast from the comedy cable network, trueTV. Charlotte is well-known in the industry for her fun-loving nature. 

On the other end of the character and genre spectrum is Charlotte’s impressive acting work in “BedHead,” from the “Fresh Blood: Pilot Season” series produced by one of Australia’s most highly-regarded network, ABC (Australia’s Broadcasting Corporation). In the key role of Corvana, Charlotte represented a comic foil to lead actor Paul Ayre, who would later win Best Actor at the LA WebFest. Earning raves from the hundreds of thousands of viewers exposed to “BedHead” and the critics who reviewed it, Charlotte notably earned the highest praise from the director himself, Ben Mathews.

“Charlotte is a brilliant actress, both at drama and comedy. Her performance in “BedHead” was absolutely hysterical and no matter how many times I have seen the show (and I’ve seen it a lot) her performance still makes me laugh.” Mathews, who won a Jury Award and Best Film Award from the prestigious Newport Beach Film Festival for directing “Emily”, a film starring “Once Upon a Time” star Meegan Warner, clearly knows what he’s talking about when it comes to established acting talent in Australia. His praise of Charlotte’s unique acting talents and accomplishments is one of many that are heard whenever the young star’s name is mentioned.  

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Charlotte at last year’s Oscar’s ceremony, with Academy-Award winning director Tom McCarthy (“Spotlight”, starring Mark Ruffalo and Rachel McAdams, and winner of Best Picture and Best Screenplay)

“I’ve been very fortunate to develop my reputation in the Australian entertainment industry, but I’ve also worked very hard.” Indeed, Charlotte also credits her experiences on projects like “Friend Request” (with “Syd2030” star Daniel Frawley) and “Suzie: Uncut” (opposite “Doctor Doctor” actor Craig Walker), as characters which helped her round out her career. Amidst laughter, she explains “[p]eople frequently remark that I’ve developed a complex body of work that reflects my distinctive talent – I’ll take that as a compliment!”

 

A new take on what it means to be a triple threat with Yana GoodDay

There is an unspoken understanding within the modeling community that confidence will carry you a greater distance than looks ever will; however, a healthy dose of both will help to build a strong career. Unlike most other professions, models are required to sell themselves within the promotion of a product. They strive to attract the focus and attention of consumers in order to increase awareness of particular brands, companies, products, and more. From fashion to glamor, to fitness and swimsuits, models are featured in a variety of media formats that surround us each and every day and they are an integral element of Western culture. With that, the modeling industry has gained a substantial amount of interest and following throughout history, with the number of working models growing and the amount of available jobs shrinking. It can, therefore, be argued that in today’s society, it is more difficult than ever to stand out in the modeling world and thrive amongst the industry’s top contenders. For Russian model, Yana GoodDay, on the other hand, rising to the top of her field has been a lifelong journey and today, she is taking her profession by storm.

Ever since she can remember, GoodDay has found herself energized by the idea of showcasing her unique allure before the world. As a young girl, she often caught herself daydreaming about the idea of seeing her face on magazine covers and walking down fashion runways in beautiful outfits. As she began turning her daydreams into a reality, she realized that not only were her talents rare in the modeling community, but they were transferable to other related professions. She decided to test her hand at acting for films such as Kids in the Cage and The Waiting, as well as television hosting. With time, she learned to balance the three job types in order to build a more well-rounded career. She has since landed herself a number of notable jobs as a model, actress, and television hostess. For instance, when the 2014 Olympic Games were hosted in Sochi, Russia, GoodDay earned herself a job as the hostess of the Games’ official welcoming ceremony.

Earlier that year, Dynamic Project Group Agency were selected to help with the preparation and coordination of the 2014 Sochi Olympic and Paralympic Games. For their official welcoming ceremony, which gathered nearly 3000 athletes from all 88 participating countries, Alena Kremer, of Dynamic Project Group Agency, was looking for a hostess who would provide a familiar face for Russian audiences, as well as one who would represent Russia flawlessly before the eyes of other audiences around the globe. Having formerly served as a reporter for Pro-TV, participated in countless runway fashion shows, posed for covers of well-known magazine companies, hosted national television programs, and more, Kremer was certain that GoodDay was the ideal candidate for the event.

“When we auditioned Yana to host the Olympic Games Welcoming Ceremony, she naturally and effortlessly drew the attention of everyone in the room from the moment she walked in. Her outstanding acting skills and outer beauty is only surpassed by her kind, sweet, down-to-earth nature and her astute intelligence. She is a lovely woman who just happens to be extraordinarily beautiful and talented. She was uniquely dedicated and highly qualified to work in this particularly demanding capacity. Fluent in both English and Russian, she possessed the ability to effortlessly switch languages according to the needs of the audience. Reliable, talented, and hardworking, Yana played a critical role in making this welcoming ceremony the successful event that it was,” raved Kremer, Managing Partner.

Beyond her work as an actress and a television hostess, GoodDay strives to stay true to her modeling roots whenever the opportunity arises. In fact, she honored this effort when she earned herself a role as a lead cover and promotional model for a number of VJ Dunraven Productions’ novels. VJ Dunraven Productions is a highly reputable production company, having released a number of renowned novels written by VJ Dunraven, such as The Promise, and The Captive Shifter. As a lead cover model, GoodDay has established a profound reputation for being able to adapt herself and her looks to suit any genre she is tasked with posing for.

“For the Captive Shifter, Yana posed in an effortlessly angelic stance as she gazed over her shoulder with a sense of purity that was, at once, innocent and mysterious in the most beautiful way,” told Maria Chronis, Founder, Executive Producer, and Director of VJ Dunraven Productions.

Regardless of the novel’s plot line or character basis, GoodDay has a natural affinity for attracting a reader’s attention. Her modeling compliments the contents of each novel and is undoubtedly the reason that so many readers feel compelled to find out what lies beneath her engaging covers. For GoodDay, it is a dream come true to be able to see herself on the cover of each novel and it reminds her of when she would gaze at books and magazines in stores as a child, wondering what it would be like to see her face on them one day. In fact, in the span of two years, she found her face on over 35 different novel covers published by VJ Dunraven Productions.

Being able to live out her childhood dreams is an indescribable feeling, and she considers herself extremely fortunate to be able to truly love what she does for a living. Between acting in films, hosting television shows, and modeling, she has established a remarkable career and she looks forward to building it day by day, and job by job in the future. For those aspiring to develop a reputation like GoodDay’s and to build the type of confidence necessary to accomplish what she has, GoodDay had the following to say:

“Whatever you choose to do, study that subject and its history. Dedicate yourself to it and be brave, but refrain from letting that bravery become arrogance or shamelessness. Work on yourself to be the best version of you that you can be. Finally, don’t forget to get some rest from time to time.”

Creative Director Mitch Crook talks Nike and establishing a successful business

When Mitch Crook recalls what initially sparked his interest in design, he credits an inspirational art teacher from his youth. Mr. Dominic Culkin, from Crook’s high school in Hertfordshire, England, would inform his student about exhibitions to see what books to read, and what magazines to buy. This teacher’s ability to connect his class to art and design opened up a world and sparked a passion for a young Crook that shaped his entire future, and he still possesses today. Little did Mr. Culkin know the impact he would have on not only his pupil, but the United Kingdom as a whole. Crook is now the Founder and Creative Director at his company Hotel Creative, a design agency behind some of the country’s most renowned retail advertising campaigns.

Despite not having heard of Mitch Crook before, you have most likely seen his work. His company, Hotel Creative, is a multi-disciplined creative consultancy based in London. His team specializes in concepts, visual design and art direction for brand communications, experiences and pinnacle retail. They pride themselves on great ideas, quality production and a high standard of delivery, combining attention to detail with a no-limits attitude. With Crook at the helm, he constantly impresses both colleagues and clients, and after seven years in business, Hotel Creative has become a leader in the industry.

“I have never come across a more brilliant, talented and charismatic Creative Director than Mitch. I am constantly astounded by the innovative experiential campaigns he creates on behalf of his clients,” said Marcus Price, Associate Creative Director R/GA, New York.

Collaborating with Nike, Hotel Creative was responsible for many of their most successful product launches, directly contributing to increased awareness and commercial sales. Through his work, Crook has been partly responsible for Nike being the dominant sportswear brand in retail across the United Kingdom and Western Europe.

“Nike is the best brand in the world. Their vision for the future is streets ahead of their competition. I’m a massive Nike fan, love their product, love their demand for excellence and how innovative they are across all fields of play. The way they took on soccer with a clear mission to be the biggest brand was outrageous, but totally Nike and look how they’ve achieved that over the last 15 years. So much of what I see in Nike reflects why I set up Hotel Creative, we share similar creative goals to do things that haven’t been done before,” said Crook.

Specializing in apex visual experiences for luxury brands, Crook is a Nike brand expert and a global design influencer. Earlier in his career, before Hotel Creative, Crook was given great insight into working with Nike whilst working his way up in the creative world. At the time, online shopping was beginning to take off, with e-commerce sites like Amazon and eBay beginning to emerge as the giants that they are today. Despite this, Crook had a vision for retail that went against this trend; he believed that physical retail could still be more successful than ever if more of an artistic and creative approach was taken, making it bigger and better than ever. It was this idea that sparked the creation of Hotel Creative, and he pitched his concept to Nike UK, and they agreed to be his founding client. The promise of work gave Crook the courage and confidence to launch his own agency, and Nike has been his principal client ever since.

“Mitch has been responsible for, and involved with some of the most iconic Nike campaigns in the world. He always looks to push the boundaries of retail design,” said Adrian Fenech, Senior Brand Director, Nike Inc.

Crook’s loyalty and passion for Nike is evident in Hotel Creative’s work with the sporting brand. His direct experience with the company and his understanding of the field gives Hotel Creative an intimate knowledge of what works. Crook says his team pushes their own boundaries every single day to consistently produce high-achieving results for Nike. Nike respects this, and gives Crook a lot of creative freedom to explore new and unique ideas, something that has become a bit of a trademark for Hotel Creative, as no other creative consultants have achieved for Nike what they have. Crook treats every project through a fresh lens, and he does not have one house style that Nike simply adopts. Every single campaign is different, and each is visually stimulating for consumers.

“We have to react, find new things, new techniques, continually adapt our creative approach to what will excite and capture the imagination of consumers and what enhances and communicates Nike’s product,” he described.

Such an approach makes Nike the best and most challenging client in the world, according to Crook. Not only do they work with Nike on local territory campaigns around the UK, Hotel Creative also works on them at a global creative level, creating future campaign directives that set the tone for their creative rollouts across the world. There is never a moment with Crook’s company is not dealing with Nike. Projects typically take about four weeks, sometimes even less, but can last up to three months. The creative process involves Hotel Creative presenting a number of creative directions and refining them to align with Nike’s product and their audience. Every day is different, processes and order are often hard to impose, but they have built up a lot of trust between each other. Crook knows what is expected of him, and never rests on his laurels.

“Nike have an unnerving sense of the future and that futuristic vision excites and inspires me. Over the last 30 or so years they have transformed into such a globally innovative brand, continually pushing technologies to create new products for both elite sports and everyday consumers. This cutting-edge approach is a magnetic force for many creatives and I’m proud of what we’ve achieved working with Nike, given they have the ability to pick the best,” added Crook.

With such a passion for his work, there is little doubt as to why both Crook and Hotel Creative have become international success stories. Crook never let his connections with Nike die down as he was building his business, and he encourages all those who look to follow in his footsteps to remember, it’s not what you know, it’s who.

“Study, work hard, play hard. Work the system and build your contacts. Surround yourself with like-minded individuals. Look who’s doing work you love or aspire to do. Contact them and ask if you can assist in any way at all,” he advised. “All knowledge is good knowledge, even if it’s a bad experience, it is something you know not to do again. Always learn and reflect on what you did and what you could have done better. Then you are ready for next time.”

Director Brett Morris showcases the drama in ‘The Real Housewives of Toronto’

Filmmaking started out as a hobby for a young Brett Morris. He was a child actor, and became exposed to movies in a different way than most other kids. The Toronto-native began making films with his sister, and it became his favorite past time. This same passion continues in his work today, and Morris is an in-demand director and producer.

Having worked on several large productions, Morris has taken the Canadian television industry by storm. Shows such as Big Brother Canada, Top Chef Canada, Hockey Wives, and So You Think You Can Dance Canada may not have achieved the success they did without him as the mastermind behind the scenes. He constantly aims to make the best product possible, and ensures all he works with do the same.

“I like to make the on-set experience an ‘idea meritocracy’ where the best idea wins.  Structuring your set this way makes for the experience to be enjoyable for everyone, and always delivers the best content. I don’t care if you’re responsible for catering, if you have an idea that will make our final product better, I’m all ears. You never know where the best idea will come from, and you have to be open and secure enough in role to listen,” he said.

Morris carried this mentality with him during his work on ten episodes of The Real Housewives of Toronto, a show that follows six of the city’s most privileged, powerful and glamorous women as they navigate the elite social scene of Canada’s largest city. This first season introduces Kara Alloway, Roxy Earle, Gregoriane (Grego) Minot, Ann Kaplan Mulholland, Joan Kelley Walker and Jana Webb. Toronto is their playground and they have the real estate, cars, and the diamonds to prove it. The show is part of the widely popular Real Housewives franchise, and when the opportunity came up for Morris to pioneer the Toronto series, he was all for it.

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Ann Kaplan and Brett Morris on the set of Real Housewives

“Working on The Real Housewives is really like working on a soap opera in the 21st century,” Morris described. “What I love about The Real Housewives is that everything is heightened.  Heightened reality television. The hair is bigger, the money is bigger, the personalities are bigger, the fights are bigger. It’s a show that seems so fabricated it has to be real, because the characters are always so magnificent.”

When the showrunner, Grant Greschuk, was looking for a director to make the Toronto version of Real Housewives a success, he reached out to producer Lara Shaw for a recommendation. Shaw instantly thought of Morris, as the two had worked together on Big Brother Canada. Once the two had a chance to talk, they instantly hit it off, and knew working together would be a triumph.

The role of director for Morris demanded a swift technical directorial eye, with a keen sense of how to arc the story to engage audiences. He led a field team of a director of photography, one assistant director, a camera operator, and a production assistant. Each one of them were extremely impressed with Morris’ directorial and leadership skills.

“Brett brought a level of camaraderie to our team that I haven’t experienced in my 14 years in the industry, and I can say I have never had such a good experience working on a show, as I did on the time spent working on Brett’s team. He had a way of raising team moral, bringing a level of levity and enjoyment to each shooting day, while working with the team to get results that brought constant positive feedback from the production management. Brett creates an extremely collaborative environment, instills confidence with his leadership and raises the confidence in his team members by constant feedback and encouragement. Brett is the kind of leader that makes you want to do your absolute best work for him. I would jump at any opportunity to work with Brett in the future as much and often as possible,” said Chris Sherry, the Director of Photography on Real Housewives of Toronto.

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Kara Alloway (Left), Ann Kaplan (Right) with Brett Morris on the set of Real Housewives

Each day, Morris and his crew would arrive two hours before the cast. They would spend this time figuring out how they would film each scene, and he says these were often his most creative hours of the day. Once the cast arrived, filming would begin. The ladies, Morris says, did not require any coaching on his part, as they were very professional, giving him more time to focus on making the best possible product.

As the director of the show, Morris’ first priority was storytelling. At the beginning of each day, he was given just the location and the cast members that would appear in the scenes. At any given time, each character had five different plots to follow, because they all have relationships with different characters. Those relationships would change on any given day and Morris always made sure to keep his head around the story despite such a challenge.

“The best part of working on The Real Housewives of Toronto was how we got to spend the summer. Sometimes in film and TV, the shooting locations and conditions aren’t the most glamorous. I’ve worked in freezing cold ice rinks, on dairy farms, dirty basements – not the most desirable of conditions.  The best part of Real Housewives was that we lived like the cast for three months. We dined at the best restaurants in the city, traveled on yachts, filmed on golf courses, even took the whole shooting crew to Barcelona for a week. The show definitely had its perks,” said Morris.

Morris is immensely proud of the work he did on the first season of The Real Housewives of Toronto. It was a small team, and with him as the leader the show championed as the number one show on the W Network where it premiered. He credits his previous work in reality television to help him bring a fresh perspective to the Real Housewives franchise. He always makes the cleanest and most efficient show he can; he aims to have the locations look as glamorous as possible; he makes sure to photograph the cast in flattering ways. Lastly, he beautifully showed his home city of “The 6” to the rest of the world.

“One of the best part of working in this industry is being able to talk with people who have seen your work. It’s the best ice-breaker to say, ‘I worked on The Real Housewives of Toronto’ because it instantaneously gets a reaction out of someone. They’ll always have an opinion about it, and always want to learn more. It doesn’t matter if you’re talking to a big jock, or an actual housewife – everyone has seen the show and everyone wants to know what it’s really like behind the scenes…. of course, though, I’ll never tell,” Morris concluded.

PEELERS IS A FRIGHTENING JOY FOR PEREZ

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Edwin Perez is an actor who is able to perform very convincingly in a wide variety of roles. There are actors who seem born to play one type and are beloved for it, and then there are those like Perez who seem to adjust in a highly believable manner to just about any genre and type of character. When you seem him perform you’ll likely think “Right, that’s what he is supposed to be.” and the next performance of his will have you saying the same thing. Whether he is Romeo in the romantic comedy “Heart Felt”, the overly optimistic bard in “Standard Action”, the Tio in “Nina’s World” (animated children’s program), he is always likable and endearing. It’s probable that this is what prompted him to accept a role in the Grindhouse film “Peelers.” In the film he can be seen dealing death and very much playing against type. There’s a grin on his face when he talks about it and the reaction that the public had to his complete 180. It’s the very purpose of Perez to keep challenging himself and the audience’s perception of who he is and what he can do.

Prior to his being cast in “Peelers”, Perez had never been in a Horror film. He’s not quick to admit it but he has leading man looks, which doesn’t often transfer to being cast as a villain (unless it’s an 80’s coming of age high school story). Edwin was particularly attracted to the way he could present his character before and after his transformation with contrasting approaches to his nefarious nature. The comical fact that he gets to do so with the name Jesus in the film is not lost on the actor. The film and his character were a constant source of challenging exploration for him as he states, “I imagined Jesus as a guy who came to the country obsessed with escaping poverty but lacking the work ethic do so with honestly. He’s a ‘get rich quick with minimal effort’ kinda guy who wants the luxury with none of the responsibility. When the group thinks they have discovered oil, he’s the one who pushes for everyone to keep their mouths shut about it. I can imagine that, in a very dark moment, he’d betray the guys to get what he wants. He goes along with the Pablo’s [the boss] plan because he is technically their boss and because it doesn’t really benefit him to push back to hard. When he transforms, I imagined that all those dark base feeling were brought to the surface and he is driven by greed that as a bestial creature has turned to a violent hunger. When it comes to these situations it’s really easy to just say, well he’s evil now so he kills people. But that’s very one dimensional and it doesn’t give me as an actor very much depth to work with. It’s really important to base his motivations on something real and true to the character. In the case of Jesus, it’s his selfish nature dialed to an extreme dark place which drives him.”

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Peelers is the story of a group of workers who find what they believe to be oil but turns out to be a toxic substance which transforms them into primal and seemingly supernatural creatures. They stalk and kill the humans whom they encounter. The creatures are feral with contorting movements and emitting primal snarls and growls. Between the prosthetics and the black substance that oozes from their pores, Perez spent a great deal of time in the makeup chair. The film utilizes practical effects rather than CGI. Edwin fully embraced the opportunity to approach the physicality of the creature he transformed into. He explains, “I wanted to show that the transformation was so extreme that normal human kinetics no longer applied to the creature. In one particular scene I get shot in the head and appear to be dead, but I get up and keep attacking. I decided to twitch and contort into as much of a grotesque posture as I could push my body into while rising back up. These things would normally be done with special effects, but we were doing it with practical effects so it really was up to myself and the other actors to bring these supernatural abilities to life. I think everyone is familiar with the trope of actors in an acting class pretending to be trees or an animal, or some object. Sometimes the creature would stalk his prey like a wolf, or play with it like a cat, and attack like a hyena. A very visceral and primal nature became the foundation for my creature work. It was cardio work for certain to make sure that energy levels were up and you are pacing yourself. Stretching was the biggest part of daily preparation. Contorting yourself into a feral beast can lead to some serious cramping.” It’s an accepted trope by the public of actors in an acting class pretending to be trees or an animal but this very real exercise proved to be highly useful in this situations for Perez.

His role in Peelers allowed Edwin to perform as two very different characters; one dark and brooding with an undertone of controlled greed and the other as a wild beast moving chaotically. This fed both sides of the actor’s creative imagination and did not go unrecognized by the audience or the cast & crew. Director Sevé Schelenz declares, “An indie horror film is demanding in a number of ways. Actors in particular don’t get the posh treatment that they typically receive in a big studio production but the demands on them are just as great, maybe even greater. Edwin brought it in terms of talent and commitment and was equally exceptional in his understanding that we were there to work hard and within a limited amount of time. I know that he was physically spent while also being covered with ooze, sometimes barely able to see or move…yet he never gave less than an amazing performance and never muttered negatively about the circumstances. He’s a true professional and earned everyone’s respect.”

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For Edwin Perez the experience of making Peelers holds no negative aspects. While it may seem redundant to say, an actor’s job is to explore different characters and stories. Being physically exhausted, covered in special effects makeup, vocalizing inhuman sounds…it’s all a part of the experience that he signed on for and relishes. A romantic lead, a professional musician, or a devious man turned to beast; these are all a part of what success looks like for Edwin. Referencing the illustrious career of Christopher Lee who was known for his work in the horror genre Perez confirms, “I was able to check off playing a villain and a monster from my actor’s bucket list. It’s really great to be able to look back at how much I have accomplished professionally. I never thought I would get the kinds of opportunities I have had and I am very grateful that so many professionals whom I respect have come along and taken a chance on me. It’s also really rewarding to know that I was able to deliver high quality work in a role that I had never done before. It really makes me hungry for more opportunities like that.”

DESTING OR DELUSION IN A TECH FORMATTED ROMANCE: MATCHED

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Technology is supposed to make our lives easier. This is the allure and attraction we have to it. Blinking lights and high res displays are not the entirety of the advancements that we embrace. Some of them are unseen and often taken “on faith.” There are certain areas in which the jury is still out and one of these is relationships/dating. Human emotions are so complex and dating rituals are so culturally biased that it’s almost impossible to apply science to matters of the heart. It has been attempted for decades with success and failure. The upcoming release Matched tackles this issue. The soon to be released Brian Enciso film of modern romance via technological assistance is equal parts comedy and sobering drama in its discussion of what society is willing to give up in terms of romance in the search for one’s soulmate. Two tech-crossed would-be lovers Jacob Hill (Ithamar Francois) and Allie Benson (Ariane Ryan) seem both destined and doomed in their love connection in this depiction of the uncertainty of a certain connection.

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While the film is futuristic, it’s a stretch to refer to it as Science Fiction. It’s more accurate to describe Matched as a story about where we are soon headed if we continue along the relationship trend that the world has been careening towards. The story is in no way a condemnation of the integration of tech and one’s relationship status but rather an offering about what the next iteration may be.

When a heartbroken young man named Jacob receives a strange package in the mail, he finds a device inside informing him that a company named E-rose has found his perfect match based on science, data, and profiling. Her name is Allie Benson and while she does seem to be a good match, the discomfort of having her complete profile in the palm of his hand is too much for Jacob to bare. Out of curiosity, he goes to the restaurant where she works as a waitress and confirms that the E-rose profile was accurate. He avoids contacting Allie on this first occurrence but she later seeks him out. The two are forced to deal with the fact that they may be perfect for each other in spite of the sterile/unromantic means which has brought them together. As a proxy for modern couples everywhere, the duo contemplates what love truly is; a mathematical formula, a choice, or something altogether different.

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More than simple entertainment, the film is a springboard for discussion about love in current times…at least for those seeking love. The discussions and life-planning presented by the characters of the film could appear weighty and cumbersome but this is offset by the score of Matched. The obvious choice of cold digital synths was rejected for this film which instead utilizes Folk music instruments such as acoustic guitar, piano, banjo, mandolin, cello, and assorted folk percussion. There’s an intuitive lighthearted and comedic sensibility to the instrumentation and score that composer Chris Wotherspoon has fashioned for Matched. A primary example of this is when Jacob makes the decision to burn the profile he has received in the mail about Allie. As it is burning, Jacob receives a call from Allie telling him she wants her personal information package back. As he literally and figuratively puts out fires, a series of folk percussion elements and a chaotic pizzicato string arrangement (still organic and folky) creates a feeling of disjointedness and comedy.

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People seem to be in constant search of a means to improve every aspect of their life. Cars, telephones, dating services…these are all merely modern accoutrements of the courting process. Services similar to the one at the center of Matched are very near existence already, it’s likely that they will soon be here. Matched gives us something to think about as we feel the oncoming changes and we must decide if what we have right now is good enough or do we risk it for what could be better…or worse?