Tag Archives: Horror Film

Tony Nash brings on the laughs and the screams in ‘Secret Santa’

When Tony Nash speaks of his craft, he talks with the passion of someone who truly loves what he does. When he steps onto a set, it doesn’t feel like work for him, but rather it feels like a privilege to have the opportunity to do what he believes he is meant to be doing every day. This young man of Greek-Spanish descent has been acting since his childhood and has taken the Canadian film industry by storm.

Throughout his career, Nash has worked on a series of successful film and television ventures. Movies such as Saving Dreams and Meet the Parents, and shows like Petrol and Condor, the highly anticipated Audience network thriller. With every new project he takes on, it becomes clear that he is doing what he loves.

“What I like about acting is that when it is approached with the sacredness that it deserves, it first and foremost holds a mirror up to me, revealing all my hidden desires, coping mechanisms, repressions, reservations, grudges, vulnerabilities, beauties, gifts, talents and strengths. In so doing, it enables me to understand the souls of others and thereby be qualified and capable of holding a mirror up to the entirety of human nature, as Hamlet advised in Act 3, Scene 2,” said Nash.

Nash’s first true taste of international success came with the 2015 flick Secret Santa. Secret Santa is a feature length film that tells the story of a group of eccentric college kids, struggling to get through the hectic exam period. This horror/comedy is a tribute to B-Movie Slashers but also takes the conventions and turns them upside down. A liquor filled party is planned, adding a Secret Santa exchange for fun. Little do our characters know, a killer is in town and has a special present for all the good (and bad) girls and boys. Dare to open your present? It might be your last. Nash was really drawn to this project because he really wanted a comedic role to add to his repertoire, and his character also had a sweet, love element to his story. More than anything however, he loved that it was an ode to 90’s slasher films.

In Secret Santa, Nash plays Professor Preston Ramsey. The role was a lead and critical to the project as he was the red-herring in the horror plot. Throughout the film, audiences are led to believe he is the secret killer. The role was crucial as he furthers a love story between himself and the other lead, his student, and distracts the viewer from the killer, making the ending more of a surprise, staying true to the horror genre. The character was a sweet, somewhat naive college professor. He also was in a rut romantically and when one of his students started to fall for him, he began to feel alive again. He is an academic and spent his whole life indoors studying while his friends were all outside playing football. He is also a hopeless romantic and had only been in one relationship, which lasted seven years. The character had to be lovable, charming, slightly off beat, and at the same time mysterious. Nash was able to bring all that to the character as well as some humor of his own, which made the set a fun environment to work in and everyone enjoyed themselves. He was able to bring the character to life and give him that nerdy quality he needed to have plus a mature professor vibe amongst a bunch of college kids in an unexpected bloody night. Nash was perfect for the role.

“When I got the role, the first thing I did was went out and bought a pair of glasses and a tweed jacket that I thought would suit the character well. I spent time in university halls watching professors teach their classes to bright students. Also, because my character was being seduced by one of his students I watched The Graduate. I watched Scream and I Know What You Did Last Summer, more times than I can count” said Nash.

Secret Santa premiered in November 2015 at the Blood in the Snow Film Festival. The film was then shown at the Toronto International Spring Horror and Fantasy Festival, and the Buffalo Dreams Film Festival. It was distributed by Wild Eye Releasing and is available at several stores on DVD including Walmart and Best Buy. Nash’s take on the vital role of Professor Preston Ramsey was instrumental to the film’s success.

“Tony was pitch-perfect in this slasher-comedy. He was hilarious, charming and ever-so-subtly mysterious to lead us towards the edge of suspicion. It was a brilliant and nuanced performance by a highly sensitive and skilled actor. Bravo Tony,” said Mike McMurran, Writer and Director of the film.

After a friend reached out to Nash telling him about the role, Nash sent in an audition tape that instantly impressed McMurran, saying there would be no one better to play the role. They instantly connected, sharing the same vision for the character and the film as a whole. As it was Nash’s first time in a comedic role, he was eager to try out something different. His versatility shone, and he perfectly encapsulated the mysterious professor. Not only did he have fun, but he says the entire cast and crew became close friends during filming. Overall, it was an incredibly enjoyable experience for the actor.

“I think it’s important to have fun sometimes and do things I am not used to. I think that life is hard enough and sometimes a little horror and comedy never hurt anyone. It’s important to just take a film and just create something entertaining for people who want to see something different. And I think Mike and his crew were able to do that very well. It was exciting to film and definitely will be exciting to watch as well,” he concluded.

Be sure to check out Secret Santa and let Tony Nash make you laugh and scream at the same time.




Edwin Perez is an actor who is able to perform very convincingly in a wide variety of roles. There are actors who seem born to play one type and are beloved for it, and then there are those like Perez who seem to adjust in a highly believable manner to just about any genre and type of character. When you seem him perform you’ll likely think “Right, that’s what he is supposed to be.” and the next performance of his will have you saying the same thing. Whether he is Romeo in the romantic comedy “Heart Felt”, the overly optimistic bard in “Standard Action”, the Tio in “Nina’s World” (animated children’s program), he is always likable and endearing. It’s probable that this is what prompted him to accept a role in the Grindhouse film “Peelers.” In the film he can be seen dealing death and very much playing against type. There’s a grin on his face when he talks about it and the reaction that the public had to his complete 180. It’s the very purpose of Perez to keep challenging himself and the audience’s perception of who he is and what he can do.

Prior to his being cast in “Peelers”, Perez had never been in a Horror film. He’s not quick to admit it but he has leading man looks, which doesn’t often transfer to being cast as a villain (unless it’s an 80’s coming of age high school story). Edwin was particularly attracted to the way he could present his character before and after his transformation with contrasting approaches to his nefarious nature. The comical fact that he gets to do so with the name Jesus in the film is not lost on the actor. The film and his character were a constant source of challenging exploration for him as he states, “I imagined Jesus as a guy who came to the country obsessed with escaping poverty but lacking the work ethic do so with honestly. He’s a ‘get rich quick with minimal effort’ kinda guy who wants the luxury with none of the responsibility. When the group thinks they have discovered oil, he’s the one who pushes for everyone to keep their mouths shut about it. I can imagine that, in a very dark moment, he’d betray the guys to get what he wants. He goes along with the Pablo’s [the boss] plan because he is technically their boss and because it doesn’t really benefit him to push back to hard. When he transforms, I imagined that all those dark base feeling were brought to the surface and he is driven by greed that as a bestial creature has turned to a violent hunger. When it comes to these situations it’s really easy to just say, well he’s evil now so he kills people. But that’s very one dimensional and it doesn’t give me as an actor very much depth to work with. It’s really important to base his motivations on something real and true to the character. In the case of Jesus, it’s his selfish nature dialed to an extreme dark place which drives him.”


Peelers is the story of a group of workers who find what they believe to be oil but turns out to be a toxic substance which transforms them into primal and seemingly supernatural creatures. They stalk and kill the humans whom they encounter. The creatures are feral with contorting movements and emitting primal snarls and growls. Between the prosthetics and the black substance that oozes from their pores, Perez spent a great deal of time in the makeup chair. The film utilizes practical effects rather than CGI. Edwin fully embraced the opportunity to approach the physicality of the creature he transformed into. He explains, “I wanted to show that the transformation was so extreme that normal human kinetics no longer applied to the creature. In one particular scene I get shot in the head and appear to be dead, but I get up and keep attacking. I decided to twitch and contort into as much of a grotesque posture as I could push my body into while rising back up. These things would normally be done with special effects, but we were doing it with practical effects so it really was up to myself and the other actors to bring these supernatural abilities to life. I think everyone is familiar with the trope of actors in an acting class pretending to be trees or an animal, or some object. Sometimes the creature would stalk his prey like a wolf, or play with it like a cat, and attack like a hyena. A very visceral and primal nature became the foundation for my creature work. It was cardio work for certain to make sure that energy levels were up and you are pacing yourself. Stretching was the biggest part of daily preparation. Contorting yourself into a feral beast can lead to some serious cramping.” It’s an accepted trope by the public of actors in an acting class pretending to be trees or an animal but this very real exercise proved to be highly useful in this situations for Perez.

His role in Peelers allowed Edwin to perform as two very different characters; one dark and brooding with an undertone of controlled greed and the other as a wild beast moving chaotically. This fed both sides of the actor’s creative imagination and did not go unrecognized by the audience or the cast & crew. Director Sevé Schelenz declares, “An indie horror film is demanding in a number of ways. Actors in particular don’t get the posh treatment that they typically receive in a big studio production but the demands on them are just as great, maybe even greater. Edwin brought it in terms of talent and commitment and was equally exceptional in his understanding that we were there to work hard and within a limited amount of time. I know that he was physically spent while also being covered with ooze, sometimes barely able to see or move…yet he never gave less than an amazing performance and never muttered negatively about the circumstances. He’s a true professional and earned everyone’s respect.”


For Edwin Perez the experience of making Peelers holds no negative aspects. While it may seem redundant to say, an actor’s job is to explore different characters and stories. Being physically exhausted, covered in special effects makeup, vocalizing inhuman sounds…it’s all a part of the experience that he signed on for and relishes. A romantic lead, a professional musician, or a devious man turned to beast; these are all a part of what success looks like for Edwin. Referencing the illustrious career of Christopher Lee who was known for his work in the horror genre Perez confirms, “I was able to check off playing a villain and a monster from my actor’s bucket list. It’s really great to be able to look back at how much I have accomplished professionally. I never thought I would get the kinds of opportunities I have had and I am very grateful that so many professionals whom I respect have come along and taken a chance on me. It’s also really rewarding to know that I was able to deliver high quality work in a role that I had never done before. It really makes me hungry for more opportunities like that.”

Producer Xueru Tang faces her fears, literally, in critically-acclaimed horror flick Emily

Xueru Tang’s life is making movies, and she loves every minute of it. Her work captivates international audiences, and her name is recognized all over the world. She is an extraordinary producer, and one of the best to recently come out of China.

While working on several esteemed projects, Tang has become an extremely sought-after producer. She has worked on films such as Locked, and Hot Pot Man. Both of these projects have gone on to do very well at several of the world’s most prestigious film festivals. However, what is perhaps the most decorated film of Tang’s career is the award-winning horror flick Emily.

“When I was asked to join the project, I was really interested. I love horror movies, but I always have trouble watching them because they scare me, so I really wanted to know how a horror movie was shot,” said Tang.

Directed by Jun Xia, the film tells the scary story of a woman named Emily. Emily dies giving birth at home after her husband, John, abandons her. However, she will have her revenge from beyond the grave when she returns as a ghost set on killing her widowed husband.

“I liked the script at first, it was short but it was interesting, and once I started working on the film, I began to really like the way the director told the story. He really caught the point at which everyone is frightened. It really made me scared. He really had his style and his visual for everything,” said Tang.

Tang was approached by co-producer Guannan Li to join the project. Li knew he needed a team of the best producers he could find, and having worked with Tang before, he knew she would be the perfect fit. Another producer on the film, Jingming Zhao, could not have agreed more.

“During development of the film, Xueru included her creative input for the film, and helped to polish the script, showcasing her creative abilities. She was responsible for renting equipment, creating and managing our budget and schedule, and making certain that this highly intensive work was made on our budget. Due to Xueru’s preeminent abilities as a creative thinker and a talented producer, she helped us to lay a foundation for the film, without which we would not have been nearly as successful. Of the many producers I have worked alongside, she is the most stand-out talent I can think of,” said Zhao.

Tang’s decisions for the film were very fruitful, as Emily has been a stand out at film festivals. After its premiere at the Los Angeles International Film Festival in August of 2015, it went on to be praised at the following festivals: Winner Best Horror Short Film – Hollywood Horror Festival 2015, Winner Best Short Film – Mad Town Horror 2015, Winner Best Horror Short – Hollywood Boulevard Film Festival 2016, Winner Best Student Horror Short – Hollywood International Moving Picture Film Festival 2016, Winner Best Student Horror Short – United International Film Festival 2016, Winner Best Director – Chandler International Film Festival 2016, Winner Official Selection Award – Chinese American Film Festival 2016, Official Selection London Digital Film Festival 2015, Official Selection International New York Film Festival 2015, Official Selection Full Bloom Film Festival 2015, Official Selection and Screening Big House Invitation Year One 2015, Official Selection Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival 2015, Official Selection Horror Short Video Contest 2015, Official Selection Los Angeles Short Film Festival 2016, Official Selection and Screening Holly Shorts Film Festival 2016, Official Selection AFMA Film Festival 2016, Official Selection and Screening Hanhai Studio 1st Short Film Festival 2016.

“When we won the first festival, we all super happy, and one by one, after like 10, to be honest, we all started to feel like ‘okay, this is normal,’” said Tang. “When we started winning the big festival, we felt happy of course. I felt like it showed how hard we worked and how good we are. When we work it can be a really hard time and not easy for all of us, but we studied from this production and we grew because of it.”

For a film to do so well over such an extended period of time, continuing to impress audiences and critics over a full year, shows just how good it is, and Tang was a big part of that. She dealt with the crew, worked on the budget, and was responsible for hiring a team that she knew could make the film the success it became. One role in particular that she tirelessly searched for was the cinematographer, as the director Jun Xia wanted someone he could work well with and share his vision. Tang spent months searching and interviewing candidates looking for that special director of photography. This effort led to finding the ideal match, and was vital for the film.

The team worked so well together, that they decided to embark on another horror film Inside Linda Vista Hospital, which production companies were eager to be a part of after Emily’s success. The second film has gone on to achieve similar feats at many film festivals, showing audiences all over the world why Tang is so good at what she does.

Production Designer Shuhe Wang contributes to the delightful horror of ‘Inside Linda Vista Hospital’

Making something from nothing is what all filmmakers achieve every day. They are creators, they are storytellers, and they are artists. Shuhe Wang knows this well. She takes the pages of a script and transforms them into sets. She creates a visual world, turning each nothing, such as a meaningless prop, into something, creating a masterpiece. She is a one-of-a-kind production designer.

While working on films such as Stay, Dancing for You, Red String, and Cartoon Book, audiences were given the opportunity to see Wang’s ability to transform a drama into a completely immersive experience, making it evident why she is considered one of the best. However, this past year, Wang has brought her extraordinary talent to a new genre: horror. Working on the film Inside Linda Vista Hospital, Wang’s production design skills were on full-display, helping to fully immerse audiences in the terrifying story.

“This is a classic horror style film, so I focused more on how to show and even amplify the emotion and tense by color, texture and overall set dressing. Even each small prop can be an important storytelling step. That quite an adventure for production designer,” said Wang.

Inside Linda Vista Hospital tells the story of a young girl who wakes up in a hospital surrounded by police covered in the blood of her boyfriend. With the help of a video camera, she slowly pieces together what happened, and she may not like what she finds.

“Horror stories are connected with our real lives, but with different point of view. I needed to find and create the elements to scare the audience and keep the emotion of the storyline in the right place, and at the same time the elements should make sense in the world.
Color and tone are always the most important parts in designing a horror story. Even a tiny subtle difference would affect the whole feeling of the set,” said Wang.

The film has gone one to do exceptionally well at some of the world’s most prestigious film festivals. It was an Official Selection at the Festival de Cannes Short Film Corner and the Pasadena International Film Festival, it won Best Director and Best Horror at the Los Angeles Independent Film Festival, Best Editing at the United International Film Festival, and Film of the Year at the AFMA Film Festival of Young Cinema 2017.

“Horror story is always a popular style, but there are a bunch of these type of films that are terrible when it comes to actual storytelling, that is what divides a good horror film from a bad one. This film is a good one because it shows a tense, strong and simple story, which perfectly matches the horror genre, so I think the film totally deserves all those awards,” said Wang.

The production design directly contributed to the film’s success. She had to design in accordance to many special effects and stunt work, and the film is set in a true historical building, and the cultural importance of this influences the story in an important way. To make the set highlight this, she researched and applied this to her work.

“It was a dramatic and kind of emotional showing story. I watched a lot of classic experimental and psychology films to get more inspiration and insight into how to let the audience feel the inner world through the production design,” said Wang.

This commitment to both the genre and the film impressed all that worked alongside Wang on Inside Linda Vista Hospital. The director, Jun Xia, knew no one else could do the job but her.

Working with Shuhe was a great experience, she was familiar with each of the details of the whole story, and her plan for working was effective for the shooting process. Shuhe is sensitive with color and designing, and she knows how to create and decide the correct textile and color to present the emotion. That is actually a really important part of the horror genre,” said Xia.

Xia approached Wang to work on his film, knowing he needed the best to make the film the success that it eventually became. When he sent Wang the reference of the visual style, so knew she wanted to take part in the project, as it was quite similar to the style she always loves.

“I felt confident and interested in designing this film after talking about the film and the story. Jun is a talented horror film director, he is always enthusiastic, and he is really insistent on what he wants which is good for making a great film,” Wang said. “What I really liked was how I could see how the set dressing worked so well when the lights and performance came together. It makes the visual complete and seemed like we accomplish the original idea of the director.”

There are many nuances to production design that are easy to get lost in the big picture of a film, but with Wang as the designer, audiences are sure to take in each and every part of it.