Strong UK Actor Larry Olubamiwo Dominates the Screen in “Catface”

Actor Larry Olubamiwo brings strength and authority into every room in which he enters, so it comes as no surprise that directors and producers frequently highlight the authority he brings to the table by casting him to take on characters with similar strength. This coupled with his deep voice and commanding 6-foot-4-inch frame not only make him a go-to for strong and dominant roles, but as someone at the top of their career, also prove him to be a rare breed of male actor when compared to his contemporaries.

Larry Olubamiwo
UK Actor Larry Olubamiwo shot by Karen Scott

In the frightening horror film “Catface”, which won Best Film Award at the prestigious African Magic Viewer’s Choice Awards, the African equivalent to the People’s Choice Awards,  Larry plays the lead role of Kaka. The film, about a vigilante born through supernatural means who decides to take revenge on a violent cult of internet serial killers, co-starred Fanny Escobar from ‘Revenge’ and the beautiful Katrina Nare, who is celebrated for her work on the hit series “Holby City.”

Larry describes his character as having “mystical powers who brings back to life a victim of a serial killer.” The murderer, Larry explains, “preys on people on the internet to exact revenge and prevent him doing it again.” The film is certainly a fitting tale for today’s age of an unscrupulous internet that continues to mystify people all over the world.

When asked about working with Larry, “Catface” director Ogo Okpue explains, “Larry is my go to actor when it comes to the projects I am working on. I have worked with him on three occasions now… His input into the project goes beyond just acting and he gives everything into the projects I have worked with him on.”

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Still of Larry Olubamiwo as Kaka in “Catface”

In a role and project that couldn’t be further from “Catface,” and one that further proves the fact that Larry Olubamiwo is an actor of incredible emotional range, the sought after actor also played a lead role in “Life of Hers.”

Another award-winning production under his belt, “Life of Hers” explores the lives and friendships of a group of people in a cosmopolitan city set against the backdrop of African diaspora. In the lead role of Mr. Balogun, Larry plays a Nigerian businessman who finds success after emigrating to the UK with his wife. In the story Balogun wants his daughter to “follow in his footsteps,” explains Larry. She, however, “wants something different for her life as she is influenced by her friends.”

Larry’s incredible performance, while different from his portrayal in “Catface,” was notably awarded when cast received an award for Best Ensemble at the 2014 Screen Nation Awards. It probably didn’t hurt their chances that the cast with whom Larry shared the screen included TV heartthrob and international sensation Tyson Douglas, known for his work in the hugely successful series “Doctors,” and Juliet de Gannes, who starred in the award-winning film “Hard Time Bus.” That Larry shares the screen in leading roles opposite such illustrious company is merely one more element that proves the long-held industry view that he is truly an actor of unique and extraordinary ability.

“Life of Hers” director Ola Masha explains, “When working with Larry I had peace of mind that he would be able to bring the character Mr Balogun to life. He had a great grasp of the narrative and would make great contributions not only in his acting but in the actually setting of the scene. Larry cooperates greatly with everyone on set and makes the shooting of the scene fly by.”

In further proof of the enthusiastic industry response to “Life of Hers,” the series screened at the British Urban Film Festival.

So what’s in store for the future of this powerful English actor?

“Catface” director Ogo Okpue mentions that he “will be making a feature film soon about people trafficking in which Larry has already been cast.”

Regardless of the incredible projects he has to look forward to, Larry Olubamiwo’s drive to perform is always comes down to his love for the craft, a testament to his integrity and exceptional ability as an actor who authentically brings characters to life, no matter the project or the genre.

When asked what it is that drives him to act, Larry explains, “For me it’s the ability to be able to immerse myself into a character, embody that character and give my interpretation of that character.”

 

 

 

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Annick Jaëgy talks dressing-up, showing up, and watching her dreams come true

Some say that playing dress-up begins during childhood and never truly ends. As we age, and we experience the ups and downs that life has to offer, we do our best to look our parts and to make our way in the world. For as long as she can remember, Annick Jaëgy has had a certain fascination with playing dress-up. When she was a child, her mother would allow Annick and her friends to explore her closet, trying on her 1960’s-style outfits and “playing pretend” in her wedding dress. Annick fondly recalls the way that way dressing-up in her mother’s old clothes made her feel; she felt alive in the stories that she and her friends created through the clothing and Annick knew that no matter where her life carried her, she would always have a desire to bring her ideas to life and to share them with the world around her.

Despite the fact that Annick and her friends no longer find themselves rummaging through her mother’s closet and pretending to be the characters in their make-believe worlds, she still feels a strong connection with the emotions and creativity that those memories instilled in her.

Nowadays, she spends her time nurturing her career as a successful film producer and does everything in her power to share the joys that she learned from a young age with audiences all over the world. With over fifteen years of experience in media and production, Jaëgy takes great pride in her ability to identify a great story when she sees one and works tirelessly to bring those stories to the big screen for film fanatics to enjoy at their leisure.

“I have learned that producers need to be able to tell a great script from a mediocre one, so having a creative spark has definitely helped me. As well, having vision has been crucial. Most importantly, however, having the business acumen and salesmanship necessary to execute that vision is paramount. You cannot turn a writer’s ground-breaking idea into reality without the right amount of funding, nor without a strong team behind it. You need to actually make it happen, by pulling together all the different strands,” shared Annick Jaëgy.

Fortunately for Annick, she has mastered each of those strands. Because she wasn’t always aware that production was her calling, she worked her way through the entertainment industry, trying her hand at various different jobs involved in filmmaking and learning the ins and outs of each one. It didn’t take her long to realize that she had a pressing desire to be involved in content and getting to have her hands on every aspect of the filmmaking process from one, single position. She always felt like there was something missing from her career and after producing her first film, Soledad Canyon, she knew exactly what it was. Since producing Soledad Canyon, Annick Jaëgy has gone on to work on hit films like Mackenzie and Gubagude Ko. In fact, in 2016, she became particularly excited about the opportunity to expand her skillset into the wonderful world of musical films when she was approached by renowned director, Dana Maddox, about her unique project, That Frank. Knowing of Annick’s love for music and costumes, Maddox was confident that Annick would help her execute her vision for the film and she was itching to watch the process unfold.

“Dana and I had worked on two projects together previously, including Mackenzie. She knew my style but, furthermore, she knew my love for musicals and how this love grew through my work at a London-based musical theatre company, as well as through my position as a co-producer of the show Cabaret in London,” Annick noted.

That Frank is a film adaptation of Stephen Sondheim and George Furth’s beloved musical, Merrily We Roll Along. It is set in 1976 Los Angeles where Franklin Shepherd, a once talented Broadway composer, abandons his songwriting career to become a Hollywood film producer. At the premiere of Frank’s latest blockbuster, his oldest friend and theatre critic, Mary Flynn, urges him to return to New York in order to regain his artistic credibility. Surrounded by the intoxicating adulation of his shallow admirers, Frank must choose between his new path and his old life that he worked so hard to achieve, as well as the friendships that got him there.

For Jaëgy, working on That Frank was unlike any other job she had ever done as a producer. She found that she had to alter her thinking a lot of the time to suit the unique nature of filming musical numbers. For instance, there are a lot of different elements involved in the rehearsal and filming process of a musical. Jaëgy loved learning about all of the intricacies involved in the film’s choreography, lyrics, timing, acting, etc. It was far more complex than she could have ever anticipated; however, she found that made the final product all the more rewarding. The biggest challenge came with ensuring that the production’s budget did not limit its potential. It was very important to her that That Frank did not appear to be a low budget musical and as a result of her devotion to this intention, the film far surpassed the expectations that its budget had set. She even managed to find an innovative solution to the question of fitting costumes into the budget, as her childhood dress-up days allowed her to put her 1970’s inspired fashion items to use. She felt a great joy in seeing her cast members clothed from head to toe in her own collection and was pleased to see the authenticity that they brought to the film.

After working with Annick on That Frank, Maddox had to keep reminding herself that this was Jaëgy’s first time taking the role of lead producer on a musical. She was astonished by her ability to improvise, lead, and go above and beyond what was expected of her for the betterment of the film.

“Going into this journey, I needed the support of a producer that could think creatively and fight for our project. There was only one person I wanted for the job and that was Annick. She knows how to satisfy the production needs without going over budget, yet still maintaining the artistic integrity and vision that I had for the piece. I knew she would be able to carry the burden of wrangling the cast, crew, and details of production. This, in turn, enabled me to concentrate on bringing my dream to the big screen. I could not have accomplished that without Annick’s support,” said Dana Maddox, Director.

Seeing That Frank successfully screen at the Palm Springs International ShortFest, as well as the Toronto International Independent Film Festival were dignifying reminders to Jaëgy that being a film producer is what she was born to do. In addition, she was humbled by the experience of seeing Maddox, as well as That Frank’s cast and crew beaming with joy for the duration of the film’s premiere. It was an emotional experience and one that Annick wouldn’t change for the world.

Meet VFX Artist Zhaoyu Zhou!

VFX artist Zhaoyu Zhou
VFX artist Zhaoyu Zhou

Beginning in the 1990s, a promising new technology kicked off a period of revolutionary change in the film industry. The advent of computer generated imagery made it possible to create worlds and characters that could never have been dreamed of before. From epic superhero blockbusters to beloved animation franchises, filmmakers across every genre rely more and more on visual effects artists like Zhouyu Zhou to bring to the screen what cameras alone can’t.

Years of experience, a background in photography and design, and a mastery of the complex technical aspects of the post-production process are what make Zhou such a powerful force in the field. Seamlessly weaving art and science in equal measures, he sculpts and breathes life into each production using cutting edge technology and the eye of a visionary.

“[Visual effects] consists of CG production such as modeling, rigging, look-development, pre-visualization, post-visualization, animation, lighting, rendering, and compositing in the typical pipeline,” Zhou explained. “All these aspects and elements are crucial to making the tremendous and surprising imagery.”

His skill set has proven to be an invaluable asset, particularly on projects like the ambitious 2016 film “Dancing Blue.” A creative tour de force that lies somewhere between an art exhibition and an extended length music video, “Dancing Blue” is a mesmerizing and at times abstract story told in three parts.

“‘Dancing Blue’… consists of everything from celluloid animation, computer animated graphics, and hand-drawn artwork,” Zhou said, describing the laborious process. “First we got the music, then started brainstorming and visualizing the motion and design based on the sound and music.”

Much of “Dancing Blue” is whimsical and surreal. The film starts in the vacuum of space, shifts focus to the inhabitants of a living painting, and ends with an absolutely hypnotic sequence of abstract animations. Zhou’s painstaking attention to detail is apparent in every frame, an incredible feat given the staggering amount of work he was faced with.

“One challenge was to create a 2D look by using 3D techniques… I used dynamic simulation and animated the smoke trail’s travels through space. However, in order to create the fluid experience I decided to animate the camera along with the strokes,” he said. “It was hard to pair both, so I went into the timeline to match them perfectly.”

Zhou was also the driving force behind “Reunion,” a heartwarming animated film about a young boy looking for his father after the two become separated. The film uses visual cues and a haunting score in place of spoken dialogue, making its stark, expressionist style that much more profound. The most striking thing about the film, however, is the method Zhou chose to use for the animation.

“Unlike most of the films that I’ve worked on, ‘Reunion’ is primarily a sand animation, shot frame-by-frame using a live-action camera. I shot footage on the camera and then ended up compositing CGI into it to create an organic and unique aesthetic to the animation, as well as to the entire film,” Zhou said. “This film has a supremely unique and original feeling.”

In addition to handling the visual effects, Zhou also wrote, directed and animated “Reunion,” giving him complete creative control over the production. The result is a truly one-of-a-kind animated experience and a pure, unadulterated representation of Zhou’s artistic vision. Of course, having control doesn’t mean the undertaking would be easy by any means.

“Shooting frame-by-frame was a big challenge, especially because I had to deal with loose, soft sand,” Zhou said. “In post-production, all the pain from shooting live-action was relieved because I could composite all those frames and added frame-blending and re-timing some shots. Even though it was sand animation, VFX in post definitely enhanced the final look of the film.”

His expertise as an animator and mastery of CGI have made Zhouyu Zhou among the most highly sought-after visual effects artists in the industry today. But it’s his artistic and creative instincts that give him an added edge. As visual effects continue to become more and more prevalent in film, it will be up to artists like Zhou to lead the industry forward.

 

MASTER OF CELEBRITY JUICE – ED THOMAS

(By Kelly James)

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British producer Ed Thomas has been involved in some very creative television programs. James Corden’s Drop the Mic, American Idol, Sam and Mark’s Big Friday Wind Up (a two time BAFTA winner), are just some of the shows you’ll see on his list of credits. He remarks, “Celebrity Juice is one of the most creative roles I’ve ever occupied. It contains so many ideas in each and every show. I led a team in generating these ideas throughout four consecutive seasons. The show contains some of the most innovative and entertaining content I’ve ever been involved in. It truly pushed boundaries.” Thomas worked closely with a team of writers to script the show on a weekly basis while also managing a team of producers and overseeing all aspects of production. During his tenure as show runner for “Celebrity Juice” the program received the National Television Award, perhaps the pinnacle of recognition in British television.

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Great Britain has a somewhat different relationship and view of celebrity than the US. Both public and celebrities are not given the opportunity to take themselves so seriously and Celebrity Juice shines a light on this. Celebrity Juice is, broadly speaking, a comedy panel show meets quiz show meets game-show meets comedy sketch show. It features celebrity guests who appear on the show to play games and generally have an outrageously good time. The theme at the heart of the show is celebrity news. Everything is held together by the host and star of the show Keith Lemon (played by the incredibly talented Leigh Francis). Lemon is outrageous by nature. He swears, says vulgar things, and goes where others dare not go but with a charming manner that repels the very idea of taking offense at his comments. In reality, celebrities embrace the show and its host, often returning multiple times. Clips of the show continually go viral and result in immense promotion for those appearing on Celebrity Juice. Ed expounds, “We used to pride ourselves on coming up with outrageous content that would send Twitter into a meltdown. Most of my friends watched the show, not because I worked on it but because they were genuine fans. I used to love it when they said ‘I can’t believe you did that on the show last night!’ We would never settle for an idea that had been seen before; there always had to be a twist that pushed it to the next level. Whether it be games of a sexual nature (“Celebrity Dogging”) or naked extras invading celebrities’ personal space, we made sure each show always contained a moment that would make guest and viewers alike say ‘Did that really just happen?’  We’d have American guests on the show who were in utter disbelief of the things we could get away with. Jason Derulo couldn’t get over the fact that he could swear on national television and Nicole Scherzinger ended up getting her toes sucked by host Keith Lemon…which was all standard fare for an episode of Celebrity Juice. One of my proudest achievements was convincing international superstar DJ David Guetta that it was a good idea for him to get into a cement mixer (which had been made completely safe) and let us spin him round, all for the sake of entertaining television. He approached me after the taping had finished, looking quite menacing. ‘That thing you made me do with the cement mixer.’ he said in his extremely French accent, followed by a pause that seemed like forever, “…absolutely genius!’ I breathed a sigh of relief.”

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Celebrity Juice began as a low budget experiment which eventually grew to its current status as ITV2’s biggest show, winning multiple awards including a BAFTA, a British Comedy Award, and 2 National Television Awards. Thomas recognizes that his time with this production was life consuming but also presented him with several lessons which have served him well, most notably that pushing the boundaries creates exciting and entertaining content. When constructed and presented in an unoppressive and light hearted manner, what can be off-putting becomes an opportunity for entertainers and audience to avoid cumbersome gravitas.

After Her Rivetting Performance in “Hypersomnia” Actress Yamila Saud is Tapped to Star in “El Encanto”

Actress Yamila Saud
Yamila Saud walks the red carpet at the Mar del Plata International Film Festival in Argentina

The stage has been Argentinian actress Yamila Saud’s second home since she was 7, and for as long as she can remember, she has come alive through acting. That passion has allowed her to become one of the most compelling actresses in film today, and her latest film is proof.

Currently streaming on Netflix, “Hypersomnia” is a dark psychological thriller from director Gabriel Grieco. Saud plays the main character, an actress named Milena who finds herself caught somewhere between nightmare and reality as the movie keeps the audience in suspense.

“Hypersomnia” is about a young actress preparing for a big stage role in a play, where her character is a sex slave who falls in love with her captor. Milena’s rehearsal experience leads her into a rabbit hole. Soon, Milena is unable to tell where her own life ends and her character’s begins. Everything begins to feel unreal and dreamlike, and Milena’s confusion quickly turns into madness.

“After an experience her character has, Milena begins to have dreams which feel very real,” Saud said. “Laly shows [the viewer] a world where women are deprived of freedom and all their rights.”

Milena’s trance-like acting exercises go haywire. The film uses the inside of a brothel as the alternate reality where Milena’s character Laly lives with other tortured sex workers. When Milena is not in the brothel playing Laly, she comes out of the trance state — from the looks of it. Yet Milena feels like the abuse and violence of playing a sex slave are all too real, like method acting gone wrong.

Saud skillfully adjusts herself to each scene as the film goes from suspenseful to dark to violent, truly embodying the character’s feeling of pain in the most believable way.

The movie was a huge challenge for me. One of the strongest and most disgusting scenes for me was when Milena is forced to enter with a client in a room, and she sits on the bed next to him,” Saud said. “The cigarettes he smoked were the same brand that my dad consumed when I was a girl. It’s horrible that girls so young are abused by men who could be their own father.”

In a huge shift from “Hypersomnia,” Saud took on a more lighthearted role as Lana in the upcoming 2018 film “El Encanto.” Directed by Juan Sasiaín and Ezequiel Tronconi, the romantic drama has both a sensual and a serious side.

The film focuses on Bruno, played by Ezequiel Tranconi, and his wife Juliana, a famous television host played by Mónica Antonópulos. Juliana is eager to have a baby, but Bruno doesn’t feel ready. The disagreement kicks off Bruno’s midlife crisis. Things get even more complicated when Saud’s character, an attractive young woman named Lara, walks into Bruno’s work.

Saud explains her critical role in the film, “My character is the knot that ties the film together. It’s because of Lara that Bruno’s character reacts and begins to realize what he really wants.”

Produced as an independent film “El Encanto,” focuses on character development. That meant Saud was able to stand out and show off her raw natural talent as an actor. The story line’s depth is explained producer Diego Corsini, saying “It’s a story of growth and maturation. It is reflecting in a poetic and sincere way that stage in which one still does not realize that he has grown and is an adult, and he wants to continue holding on to a past adolescence.”

Saud’s drive and passion for film show so pressingly in every role she plays. A dedicated artist, Saud pushes herself to go above and beyond the call of duty.

“I am a proactive actress who does not wait for the opportunity. I get completely involved in each project and don’t hold back, knowing I am making my mark.”

 

WRITING BOTH SIDES OF A STORY WITH SHREEKRISHNA PADHYE

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Life imitates art, art imitates life…it’s all the same thing to writer Shreekrishna Padhye. His vocation as a writer has allowed him to investigate and mix the influences of each into the other. Yes, it’s a bit like playing God when you write, but it gives back as much as it takes from humanity. What is communicated is just as much based in fact as it is in the interpretation of those receiving the information. As Padhye explains, “I have always been fascinated by the transformation a script can go through in the hands of actors. No matter how specific you try to be with tone and character motivations, an actor can fundamentally change the scene with just their performance and highlight a different side of the story. I wanted to explore that with a small film, so I wrote one with obvious conflicts and had actors play the action in two different manners. In every fight/argument both sides feel like they are right and more sympathetic.” In the film “My Way, Your Way” the writer was simultaneously studying and displaying social interaction, characters, and the actors who were themselves presenting the lines and actions. Shreekrishna Padhye might just be the most modern & entertaining version of B.F. Skinner that you’ve ever seen.

Padhye openly admits that he mines the events and interactions which he sees in real life for his writing. This is not an uncommon event for a writer. What is unusual about this writer is that he likes to entertain and diffuse the negative actions and thoughts of the characters and the viewers of his films by showing just how petty and selfish they can be, served with a very humorous tone. “My Way, Your Way” is a comedy. In the story we see the events through the eyes and emotional tint of two coworkers. What is presented is almost a form of therapy for the audience and the writer. Seeing the awfulness of people presented in the absence of condescension and finger pointing allows the recognition of our own lesser desired attributes. Humor is the conduit by which Shreekrishna delivers this. “My Way, Your Way” presents the same office workplace occurrence seen through the point of view of two separate people. In the first version, John tells his friend at work (Sean) that he has just been promoted. To John’s surprise, Sean doesn’t take the news very well. Instead of being happy for his friend’s good fortune, Sean storms out of the office. In the second version, John rubs it in Sean’s face that he is being promoted. John proceeds to humiliate Sean and takes over his office, forcing him out. Both the versions have the same dialogue, but the actors put a completely different spin on it each time.

Padhye’s character driven style has made him a favorite among actors. He specifically wrote this film with the actors in mind. Watching actors interpret his words and infuse them with different tones made him more aware of the power of these professionals to shade the message. While a writer creates the setting in both books and films, the reader’s imagination colors the world while a viewer’s is heavily dependent on the actor’s portrayal. The dual presentations of the film emphasize this aspect. The first interpretation of the story depicts John as hard-working and deserving of the promotion while his friend Sean is resentful. In the following presentation (seen through Sean’s eyes) John is a suck up who is less deserving than himself. What’s amazing about the film is that these drastically opposed perspectives are done using the same dialogue.

A self-described actor’s writer, it’s his respect for the contributions of actors that led Padhye to creating this project. A writer’s words mean nothing if actors don’t bring them to life. Shreekrishna is adamant that the spark in the process is creating great dialogue. Filtering real life experiences into an interesting story starts here as he explains, “The key to making dialogue seem realistic is to develop an ear for it. Even though we hear people talking every day, we don’t focus on their choice of words, speed, or emphasis. We usually extract relevant information and move on. My job as a writer is to study people and their behavior. The manner in which people talk is fascinating to me and I have trained a part of my brain to pay attention to words and after conversation, I usually play the interaction back in my head and reexamine it. If I hear a unique phrase or pronunciation, I make a note of it. I may not ever end up using the exact words in my script but questioning the thought process behind it helps inform my characters. Even so, a conversation in a film is very different to one in real life. Real life conversations are long and slow. If portrayed verbatim on film in this way, they would seem incredibly boring. The key to keeping dialogue interesting is to keep it short and specific to conflict at hand. Every character needs to have a distinct voice. Even if the character names were scrubbed from the script, you should be able to differentiate the lines of each character.”

The presentation of entertainment productions has transformed immensely in the last few years. Productions are created for online presentation and are used by more traditional studios and networks to find exciting new productions and artists to add to their brand. “My Way, Your Way” garnered immense attention from both the industry and the public with 100,000 views on YouTube. There was a time not so long ago that these studios and networks had a vision of entertainment that would appeal to everyone but the popularity of online formats have proven that the most unusual and creative ideas can unify a very committed fan base. In all artistic endeavors, a strong voice will find an audience. Shreekrishna embraces these opportunities and the experience commenting, “I’m lucky to have started my career right in the middle of this seismic shift the internet has brought to the entertainment industry. Streaming services have become so ubiquitous that it no longer matters what method of distribution a piece of content was originally produced for (Broadcast, Cinema, Cable or Streaming). Because of all the new outlets, content production is at an all-time high. This is great for all artists as it provides many more opportunities. The greatest strength is also the greatest obstacle as it is possible for a piece of art to get lost in a sea of great content. Even so, the viewer is always the winner.” Each film Padhye writes seems to receive more and more praise. If his goal is to create stories that stories that allow people to see themselves and their potential selves, it seems to be an idea that the world is open to contemplating.

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Actress Ingrid Haubert’s Magnetism On Screen Captivates Audiences

MpireStudios
Actress Ingrid Haubert shot by Mpire Studios

Some actresses have a certain magnetism when they hit the screen that captivates audiences and makes us want to watch them. Australian actress Ingrid Haubert, who’s known for her starring roles in the films “2Survive,” “Ambrosia,” “Painkiller” and more, is one of those dynamically talented performers who draws us in with every role she takes on.

While Haubert, who resides in LA, has only been in the states for a few years, she began her acting career early on whilst living in Australia. “I always wanted to be an actor, I think I came out of the womb wanting to act,” she says with a laugh. “I began acting professionally when I was 15 and attended the Australian Academy of Dramatic Art.”

With her white blonde bob, piercing blue eyes and pale skin, Haubert is not only uniquely beautiful, but the way she brings her characters to life on screen makes it impossible to peel our eyes away. Through the wide range of performances she’s given to date, such as portraying the snobbish stylist in season 5 of MTV’s multi-award winning series “Awkward.,” to Dawn, the cunning girlfriend of the lead character in “Painkiller” who orchestrates an elaborate plan to help her love escape from prison, it’s easy to see that Ingrid Haubert has a powerful range on screen. Clearly acting was what she was born to do.

Ingrid Haubert
Ingrid Haubert shot by Abigail R. Collins

Haubert explains, “There are so many things about acting that fill my soul… I think I’d have to say the biggest thing for me always comes back to the story. I love stories. When my mum would read to me at bed time when I was a child I just wanted to be in the story, I wanted to have adventures, and feel, and experience. When I read a script with great story I get so excited to create what is happening on the paper and bring it to life.”

In 2015 Haubert took on the lead role of Amber in the dramatic adventure film “2Survive” directed by Tom Seidman (“Horizontal Accidents,” “The Christmas Bunny”), which is available to stream on AmazonPrime, Google Play and vudu.

A ‘found footage’ film, “2Survive” follows a cast of reality show contestants into the desert where they compete against one another in hopes of winning the $100,000 grand prize; however, after only one night in the desert the contestants wake up to find the cameraman, the only one of them who’s in contact with those running the show, is dead.

Starring alongside Golden Globe Award nominee Erik Estrada (“CHiPs,” “Finding Faith”), Jonathan Camp (“S.W.A.T.,” “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.”) and Michael Laurie (“Nuclear,” “CollegeHumor Originals”) Ingrid Haubert gave an impeccable performance as Amber, a cute but naive waitress from Studio City, who’s a pivotal contestant on the show.

“She starts out as this seemingly stupid, helpless girl, but over the course of the film realises her strength and ability and comes into her power as a woman,” explains Haubert about her character.

Stranded in the desert with no way of contacting anyone from the show and only a day’s worth of food and water, the remaining contestants decide that their only option is to continue on with the missions in hopes that it will lead them out of the desert. Their individual weaknesses and strengths come out as they try to piece together the clues that will lead to the next destination; however when Peter, one of the contestants, finds a clue and keeps it to himself as the competition is still on, the situation becomes increasingly dire for the rest.

Out of all of the characters, Amber (played by Haubert) is by far the most dynamic and intriguing, and as more and more layers of her personality are revealed she serves as the driving force that keeps viewers watching to see what will happen next. Initially appearing as no more than the blonde bombshell assumedly chosen to compete due to her good looks, we soon learn that Amber has a unique capacity to solve intricate problems, which prove invaluable to the team.

“I really enjoyed playing Amber, she was a lot of fun. I was determined though, not to let her just be an airhead. I wanted her to have substance and vulnerability, something to make the audience care about her and root for her,” explains Haubert. “In the story she forms a close bond with Bruce, as they are both lonely people. I made my objective for her to bring Bruce back. I felt that this was something that audiences could connect to as the character of Bruce is so lovable.”

While the other characters get wrapped up in their desperation to survive and begin to turn against one another, Amber maintains her benevolent nature and devotes herself to helping Bruce, an overweight gay buddhist, keep up as they try to make it out alive.

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Actors Michael Laurie, Jonathan Camp, Stephanie Greco and Ingrid Haubert at the Los Angeles premiere of “2Survive”

Haubert’s costar Stephanie Greco (“Phoenix Falling,” “Rest for the Wicked”), who played Violet in the film, says, “Ingrid was a dream castmate… She is incredibly talented. I remember there were times when I was done shooting for the day but I stayed around to watch her scenes. She has an energy about her that draws people in and she lights up any room she enters. She’s magnetic and I’ve worked in this business for over a decade now and can say that is a quality most people desire, but rarely have. For her, it is just a part of who she is.”

Besides the appeal of both the story and her character, another aspect of “2Survive” that made Haubert decide the project was one she wanted to be a part of us was the unique way that the film was shot. As viewers watch the film they soon notice that all of the contestants’ helmets are equipped with cameras which, in the film’s story, are intended to capture footage from their personal perspective as they compete on the show. This was key as key element in both the fictional story and the shooting of the actual film, as Haubert explains, “We did actually film with the cameras that were strapped to our helmets, a lot of people don’t believe this, but it is true. We would often be filming a scene but having to stand in weird poses in order to ‘get the shot,’ but then also having to be natural.” She adds, “The whole making of the film was a memorable experience. It’s not everyday that you are an actor and camera operator at the same time.”

Ingrid Haubert is one actress who’s continued to captivate audiences across continents with her performances in both the theatre and on screen, and she continues to push her craft to new heights. In recent years she’s expanded the scope of her work to include performing stand-up comedy on stages across Los Angeles.

“I had a number of friends who also do stand up who had been bugging me for years to try it due to my comedic abilities. And one day, I decided to. It’s really invigorating that I can make my own material, direct myself, and basically have control over all aspects of the performance,” explains Haubert. “I’ve done shows at EXTRA Comedy Show, which is held at Junior High, Drunk on Stage at Akbar, The Comedy Stew at Bar Lubitsch, and Late Nights at the Loft Ensemble to name a few.”

Up next for Australian actress Ingrid Haubert is the sci-fi film “Birth,” which is slated to begin filming later this month and will be directed by award-winner Brett G. Walker (“The Groundskeeper,” “Box 3125”). Haubert will take on the lead role of Tehra, an alien lost in a new world.