SEBASTIAN SACCO PORTRAY’S THE CREATIVE STRUGGLE IN “THE PATH”

Art imitates life and life imitates art. Whether it is in the artistic presentation of the real life experience, people are fascinated by passion. Love, hate, greed, altruism, faith, family, all of these involve this provocative emotion. Some enjoy a calm lifestyle while others are driven to the flame by their desires. Either can be a soothing or precarious scenario. For actors like Sebastian Sacco, he cannot deny his pursuit of a creative lifestyle. It’s not all red-carpet premiers and adoring fans. Quite often it means freezing in the rain while being shot with (paintball) bullets on a war film (as he did in Tommy), or being held underwater for long periods of time (in the Flawes music video “Don’t Wait For Me”). Even when he is given a less physically demanding role to play, it is often emotionally taxing, as in the film The Path. This film delves into the mindset and emotional obstacles of someone who pursues a life as an actor and the everyday securities with which they must forego; it’s a role which Sacco is ideally suited to play. He stars as Seb in the film by writer Harry Chadwick and directed by Tobias Brebner. This 2015 film investigates the sacrifices and uncertainties made in the pursuit of a dream, and the measures it takes to stay on that path.

If you transferred the same fixation and enthusiasm that one might have for say…futbol (or football, depending on your place of origin) you would have an indication of what dancers, writers, musicians, actors, and other creative types feel for their vocation. The true immersion of your joys and pains, fixated on one specific thing…it can be overpowering. Many entertainers profess their love of their creative pursuits while also recognizing the fact that it often requires them to forego a “normal” life and relationships. These careers are never 9 to 5 jobs. Witnessing Sacco’s performance as Seb feels like watching a new form of audience-viewable intense therapy. His character deals with the same doubt, drive, insecurities, and relationship struggles that undoubtedly almost every creative centered individual experiences. Specifically, this film focuses on a relationship. The Path is the story of an actor pursuing his dream. In this pursuit, he meets and falls in love with someone. Seb is constantly divided in his motivation between love and the demands of pursuing his career. He desperately wants the relationship to work but he can’t help but become diverted from it by the focus needed to pursue his dream. Seb realizes that he can only pursue one end and must choose between her or his passion. He takes the plunge and heads back on his path towards his dream.

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Sebastian has played many leading roles. It’s any easy conclusion to make that the reason so many critics and viewers found his portrayal of Seb in The Path so authentic is because it is so close to his own life experience. He confirms, “I’m very close to who this character is and what he has lived. Seb really has to deal with one big question. Life is filled with so many little decisions that dictate the path we follow but this film wanted to focus on just the big stuff for Seb; the huge pull for a loved one or for your dream and passion. It’s a sad fact that sometimes the two cannot work together. Towing the line in-between just makes both unhappy. I denied this fact in my own life for a long time. I had wanted to be an actor ever since I was a kid. I didn’t allow myself to consider it as a real possibility for such a long time. As I grew up and felt pressures from other factors, I just slowly pretended I wanted other things. I tried to forget about acting or tell myself I’d do it later. I attempted to use other things to occupy my attention rather than allowing myself to pursue my true desire. Eventually, when I made the decision… nothing else mattered. I wasn’t going back. I wasn’t going to deny myself again. That’s the exact struggle my character endures. I’m certain that most people who pursue creative lives relate to this, I was just fortunate that I found a film which allowed me to tell the story that many of us relate to.”

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Many of the scenes in The Path are emotionally taxing but one scene in particular depicts a physical representation of Seb’s turmoil. It’s somewhat humorous that Sacco has had a number of roles in his career that require submersion in water for long periods of time. It’s not a scenario or achievement which one regularly associates with a particular actor. Director Tobias Brebner (who has worked with such acclaimed actors as Kevin Spacey) notes, “We had to shoot Sebastian in the freezing wind and rain in Scotland as he traversed through the wilderness. On top of all that, he had to perform a sequence in which he had to jump into a freezing cold lake in the lake district during each take. Despite the obvious physical discomfort he was in, Sebastian performed each take with the utmost professionalism, never complaining about the conditions and always able to stay in character. His performance is a testament to the theme of the film – always enduring and working toward a goal regardless of the external circumstances. The success we achieved would not have been possible without his amazing talent and commitment to the film. In fact, I would go so far as to say he is the film.”

Sebastian agrees that he is quite close to his character in The Path. While he may not have made immense personal discoveries working on this production, it reinforced a pillar of his beliefs as he comments, “Seb reminded me to always follow your dream. The path might change or you might go in a different direction than you thought but, always keep following your dream.”

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