All posts by Lorraine Wilder

John Wate brings authentic Japanese culture to ‘Samurai Headhunters’ documentary

Whenever John Wate steps onto a film set, puts his eye to a camera lens, and starts making a movie, he is living his dream. Directing is a pleasure he can’t compare to anything else; it allows him to be in tune with what is happening in front of him, and all his senses go into overdrive. He spends every day doing what he truly loves, and this passion translates directly into his beautiful work.

For this German native, making a good movie is all about the research. He always aims to find the perfect story and the right characters, with the singular goal of leaving an impression on his audience. With his work on the Smithsonian’s Epic Warrior Women film series and movies like Samurai Warrior Queens, he does just that, showcasing why he is an industry-leading director in his country.

“I would say as a director you are a storyteller, and the way you have lived and seen the world will organically shape how you tell your stories. I found that the world is a treasure trove that has so much to offer in terms of stories and characters. Once I find that ‘one thing’ that interests me, I can start digging and I usually find gold,” said Wate.

Wate has spent many years directing masterful films and television series, including the TV movie Samurai Headhunters in 2013, that allowed him to explore a unique part of world history. It is a documentary on the dark and brutal side of the samurai warrior clans featuring the life of peasant Masa who is forced into the ruthless world of the samurai.

For over a thousand years, the samurai have been celebrated as an aristocratic warrior class. Exceptionally skilled and loyal until death, their very name has become a byword for honor and dignity. This film reveals the unknown dark side of the samurai – a fascinating tale of greed, treachery, extreme cruelty and violent death. Based on newly discovered samurai war manuals, Samurai Headhunters reconstructs the life of a young peasant farmer who is press-ganged into a warlord’s army. Driven by his love for a village girl of noble birth, young Masa quickly rises through the ranks from simple foot soldier to venerated samurai commander. But his reward is to be one of betrayal, lies and finally forced suicide by his fellow samurai. Interwoven with this dramatic story, two British historians track down remarkable new evidence from ancient war manuals that show the true, dark world of the samurai. The drama documentary also features a living samurai master and his students, as well as CG animation, stunning re-enactments, original costumes and historic locations.

“Everyone knows the samurai as loyal, courageous fighters with a strong moral code – but not many people know that this is only part of the story. During the almost 200 years of civil war in Japan the samurai got rewarded for their deeds in battle, which often meant for the number of heads they had taken. The film explores the unknown dark side of the samurai, how they cheated, lied and murdered to gain favors and advance their careers, the forbidden love between warriors, the atrocities of samurai warfare, and the danger to rise to fame in such an environment. I found all these facts about the dark side of the samurai as grizzly as they were fascinating,” said Wate.

After great success with his previous film, Ninja Shadow Warriors, Wate teamed up once again with Urban Canyons Producer Sebastian Peiter and together with researcher Anthony Cummins, they researched and built the concept for the film. Living in Japan at the time, Wate not only had extensive experience, but he also had direct links to the famous Japanese film studios in Kyoto, and through all his previous other documentaries had direct access to Japanese cultural icons, such as sword masters, swordsmiths or traditional armourers. He was the ideal director for the job.

“You need to have a feeling for Japanese manners and that what they say is not always what they mean. I think a lot of the fascination for the samurai comes from the exotic mixture of stoic readiness, their manners and proper conduct in life and in battle. But if you want to show that, you have to know HOW they did certain things and why. You can’t just use a Western blue-print to invent what the character would do. At that time I lived in Japan, I spoke the language and understood their manners and hints, like that a certain gesture can reveal the opposite of what has been said. The timing, the tempo or movement of people speaking at formal gatherings. These are all subtle things that can build an authentic exotic flavor that is fun to watch,” he said.

Samurai Headhunters has been extremely popular since its release. It has aired in over thirty countries, not only on television channels but also various exhibitions about the samurai culture. It is currently showing in the prestigious Kunsthalle Munich, a German national art museum.

Xin Yi helps take us back to the ‘80s with new ‘Rocket League: Radical Summer’ trailer

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Xin Yi

As a renowned 3D Artist, creating stunning visual effects seen by audiences around the world, China’s Xin Yi is incredibly adaptable in her work. She does not have a specific style or trademark, but rather focuses on creating the most stunning imagery she can in whatever style the project demands. She can make visual effects look as realistic as a photograph, blending seamlessly with their surroundings, or a stylized animation that captures the hearts of its viewers.

This outstanding versatility is evident in all of her work, no matter the genre or medium. Whether creating the virtual set for NFL Redzone or modeling, materials, lighting, and some transitions and characters for the World of Warcraft Arena World Championship, Yi focuses on the details to create artistic effects.

Recently, millions around the world saw Yi’s work in the Rocket League: Radical Summer trailer, although they may not know it.

Rocket League is a vehicular video game developed and published by Psyonix. It is like soccer, but with rocket-powered cars and has up to four players assigned to each of the two teams, using rocket-powered vehicles to hit a ball into their opponent’s goal and score points over the course of a match. Released in 2015 for Microsoft Windows and PlayStation 4, with ports for Xbox One, macOS, Linux, and Nintendo Switch being released later on, it is a now iconic game, with its own professional league and a vast worldwide following.

Radical Summer is an extension of the game, a celebration of ’80s movies, television and culture. The extension has new items, game modes, DLC, and more. Available From 6/10 to 8/12 on Xbox One, PS4, Nintendo Switch, and PC.

“It is a pretty fun game to play with friends, even though I am not usually a gamer. The Radical Summer pack is super fun and cool as well,” said Yi.

After previous success on the Rocket League: McLaren 570S Car Pack Trailer in late 2018, Yi and her team at the motion graphics design and animation production studioCapacity were once again invited to create captivating cinematics to promote this new development of the game.

Before beginning work on the trailer, Yi did some research on Rocket League to know more about their style and at the same time, she watched movies from the ’80s and listened to music from that time period. Understanding more about the time period was essential in creating an ‘80s appearance and style in her work.

Yi did all of the rigging parts and exported them to let other teammates make an animation out of them and she also helped to animate one of the shots. She worked tirelessly to make the trailer both stunning to watch while matching the game’s style. She also did transition work to make the shot transfer to the next shot smoothly and did a composition for the TVs in the trailer to allow other artists to replace the footage easily.

“It is a really interesting project to work on. It brings us back to the ’80s, the rock music years. The pack is also using many elements from some 80’s culture, television from the decade and blockbusters,” said Yi.

Yi’s work on the rigs, animation, composing, materials, scene transitions, and renderings of this trailer paid off. The trailer was released on Rocket League’s official website and YouTube in June 2019. It received many positive comments and a lot of people were looking forward to playing the newly released pack. It has over 3.6 million views on the official YouTube link so far, and greatly contributed to the Radical Summerpack’s ongoing success.

You can check out the Rocket League: Radical Summer Trailer to see some of Yi’s beautiful 3D artistry.

Composer Weijun Chen dances away with audiences’ hearts in Aspen

The moment Weijun Chen puts his pencil to a piece of staff paper, he allows inspiration to overtake him. From the outside, watching him sketch notes onto a piece of paper, it may not seem like the most glamorous job, but when an orchestra is performing his music that he spent so long crafting, he feels truly alive.

Chen is a classical composer, writing music for symphony orchestras, chamber ensembles, instrumentalists, and singers, which is then performed at grand concert halls and music festivals all over the world. He is a renowned composer, best known for Three Earlier Songs, Watercolors, and Canoe, to name a few.

“I write every single note on the page, from vague ideas, sketches, to complete scores. In terms of the writing process itself, I am quite old-fashioned. I always start with pencil and staff paper, and eventually move to the computer during the engraving and mock-up stages. Once the piece is finished, I work closely with the musicians to bring the music to life. Often times, some of my works were written for a specific soloist or group of musicians, so the collaboration process starts during the writing stage. I also enjoy collaborating with artists from other disciplines, as my music often draws influence from poetry and visual arts,” said Chen.

Chen has seen much success throughout his career, but he believes the highlight came when he wrote the orchestral version of his piece Dancer. Already a success as a chamber piece, Chen decided to rework Dancer for an orchestra after being awarded the Jacob Druckman Prize by the Aspen Music Festival in 2015 with an invitation to the 2016 festival to premiere new work.

“I believe that writing for orchestra is a composer’s highest calling, and there is no better feeling than hearing your music performed by a large orchestra at a premier classical music festival in the beautiful mountains of Colorado,” said Chen.

Despite the title’s implications of continual movement and activity, Danceropens with somber stillness, a single chord that then gradually collapses under slowly descending scalar lines. As the glacial motion rises again through chromatic dissonances, gentle clusters form periodically, producing alternating moments of tension and relaxation. Then, after building in intensity, scale fragments and rapid turn figures cascade through the orchestra, initiating the swirling, dancing central section. This culminates in a growling climax and a grand pause, leading into the concluding slow section.

“When I was drafting this final slow section in February 2016, I was shocked and saddened to hear the news of American composer Steven Stucky’s passing. Stucky was the director of composition at the Aspen Music Festival where this piece later received its premiere. The last section unmistakably became an elegy, in memory of my beloved mentor,” said Chen.

Chen decided to create an orchestral version of Dancer after the success of the original chamber piece for several reasons. Musically, when he was working on the chamber version, he realized that the intended soundscape, in particular the overlapping scale lines, would have great potential written for an orchestra. When the opportunity arrived from the Aspen Music Festival in 2016, he jumped on it immediately.

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2016 Aspen Music Festival
Bowing after the premiere of Dancer
W/ Aspen Philharmonic Orchestra & conductor George Jackson

The orchestral version of Dancer is both an expansion and a reduction. By expansion, the ensemble got bigger by ten-fold, and Chen was able to fully take advantage of the color palate of an orchestra. Dovetailing techniques are used extensively in the piece, as Chen threads the scale materials across the entire orchestra. By reduction, he deleted a large portion of music from the chamber version, specifically the Spanish-dance-influenced melodic section, as he felt that the materials were out of focus and not as compelling.

“It was simply amazing to see how my music came alive in the hands of seventy incredibly talented young orchestral musicians, under the baton of Maestro Jackson. It was also immensely gratifying to hear the transformative improvements from one rehearsal to another, and the premiere performance was deeply moving,” said Chen.

After its premiere at the 2016 Aspen Music Festival, the performance received a brief mention in The Aspen Times. The reviewer, Harvey Steiman, stated that “Dancer explored resonant harmonies and sonorities and reflected fine command of orchestration and form.” The piece was also a finalist in the 2017-18 The American Prize in Composition, Orchestra Music.

“I felt extremely grateful. As composers, we completely rely on others (i.e., the musicians) to bring our wildest imaginations to life. It is even more true in an orchestral setting, simply due to the sheer number of players and moving parts. This piece would not exist without the support and dedication from the music festival, Maestro Jackson, and the amazing musicians of the Aspen Philharmonic Orchestra,” said Chen.

On top of its success, Dancer has deep meaning for Chen. The greatest reward, for the composer, was honoring his mentor and friend.

“It was impossible not to think of Steve when I was at the premiere in Aspen. I was honored to share this piece with many of his colleagues, friends, and students in the audience. I miss him dearly, and I hope that the success of the premiere would make him proud,” he concluded.

 

Cover photo by Ahron Cho

The Artist Life with Frances Folies

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There are layers in the meaning of the word “artist.” These are important because the difference between being skillful at your craft and possessing this AND an expansive vision for its possibilities is what separates talent from true artistry. The latter describes Fraukje Van De Wiele aka Frances Folies. An artist can be anyone from a painter to a pastry chef; Fraukje’s work as a makeup and hair artist displays the traits that make her an internationally recognized leader in her field. Print and the exponentially increasing digital formats which exhibit the world’s many interpretations of style & fashion have given this Belgian born talent the opportunity to expand the many “beauty dialects” of our time. From celebrity models, to fashion influencers, and everyday people, Frances Folies has become an important part of the evolving discussion of what defines beauty. More importantly to her, it’s a way of presenting the strength and importance of women today.

Every artist is part historian. As they say, “You must know the rules to break them.” Francisco Valencia’s Elegant magazine (the online version of which is Mith Magazine) featured Frances’s work with Belgian photographer Babeth Albrecht in the photo essay titled “Pink Inception.” Albrecht’s minimalist approach found a counterpoint in Folies lively yet sparse use of color. Frances remarks, “Nature is a major inspiration to me. Though I lean towards the dramatic, the beauty in small things can be quite impactful. Flower petals, landscapes; these things can go unnoticed until something focuses your gaze on them. This is when you take notice of the majesty of nature. It’s peaceful and powerful.” “Pink Inception” displays the spectrum of Folies work as she exercises subtle restraint yet still manages to infuse Albrecht’s framing with flourishes of chromaticity.

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Folies finds her true north in looks that are the inverse of self-conscious, at least in regards to a visual demeanor. Women are not a monolith. There is no single accepted definition of what makes a woman feminine or attractive; nor should there be. Frances holds the contention that a woman is perhaps most powerful when her look is strikingly feminine. As she states, “It’s important to celebrate femininity in all forms. I love the over the top Glitter & Kitsch of Burlesque. I always tend to create something dreamy, girly, glamourous, and pretty; however, I also like to clash and contract in styles. I’ve been drawn to it since my youth. It’s about claiming who you are. I can love Hip Hop just as much as 50’s Jive; beauty and personal expression should not be any different.” Vetting Folies acclaim in this approach, model Gia Genevieve specifically requested Frances as her makeup artist on the photoshoots which created Gia’s 2018 pin-up calendar. Known for gracing the covers of major publication like Galore Magazine and Playboy (in which she was also featured), starring in music videos like “Now That You’re Gone” by Grammy-Award winning band The Raconteurs, and a massive Instagram following, Genevieve has come to define this retro approach to modern beauty. Photographed at the iconic Madonna Inn, the photos are a benchmark for Vintage glamour style in the 2010s.

The strength of a true artist is in their vision and its relevancy, rather than attaching themselves eternally to one form. Displaying her versatility, Folies recently worked on a photo shoot for the French photo art publication Normal Magazine. US photographer Paul Zhen enlisted Frances for the project which took place directly across from the Louvre in Paris. Surrounded by the original 19th century décor, four models (@CharlineMuse, @alexandrazimny, @tanyachubko, @chloejasmincjw- British- X factor finalist UK 2014) appear in garb inspired by the era of Marie Antoinette. Reminiscent of a period that coveted class and formality above all, Frances recreation of the look somehow infuses a modern attitude with this classic look. The delicate nature of combining such contrasting ideals in a cohesive manner is not to be understated or under appreciated. The stunning handmade period inspired dresses featured in the photos were created by the famous @Ritual_official. This re-einvisioning of historical style between Zhen, Frances, and @Ritual_official features the drama of late 1700’s France with the titillating color of present day. Even in this traditional setting, Frances has found collaborators who are empowered by her exciting presentation.

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While it isn’t the most discussed component of an artist’s personality, responsibility is one found in the greats. Frances has no misconceptions that her work as a makeup artist supersedes the importance of the commerce taking place in a majority of the industry. Even makeup can’t compete with specialized filters and the kind of pressure placed on women to reach an impossible standard of beauty. To offset this, Frances reveals, “That’s why I offer from several times a year professional photoshoots in collab with a female photographer who has the same goal to prove to everyday women that they also can be as glamorous as professional models. After this type of photo session, the female clients go home with lots of confidence and feel good about themselves. This is part of why I love my job so much. Not only do I want to create visual magic but, I also love to give everyone a good feeling about themselves. It feels great to make them happy and see that sparkle in their eyes when they look in the mirror at themselves when hair-and make-up is done. That is truly the biggest satisfaction of my job, that feeling of enjoying beauty in all its shapes and forms.”

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(All photos courtesy of Lesley Hoste)

Max McLachlan helps kick-off the newest season of ‘The Voice Australia’

As a renowned cinematographer, Max McLachlan translates a vision into a visual. Through the use of lighting, camera, and lenses, he tells a story. Originally from the Northern Beaches of Sydney, Australia, McLachlan is now a recognized name around the world for what he does, and his passion for his work translates directly to what audiences see on screen.

“The Cinematographer must work closely with the Director to ensure their vision comes to life in front of the camera and I find that whole process so exciting and satisfying,” said McLachlan.

McLachlan is an asset to any project he takes on, with a vast knowledge in Steadicam operation that allows him to consider original camera movement suggestions that many may never have considered. This unique approach can be seen in many of his projects, from his new acclaimed horror flick The Furies to DZ Deathrays’ award-nominated music video “Like People”. He has extensive training in a variety of camerawork, and this versatility creates an outstanding viewing experience for audiences.

“I love the juxtaposition when handheld footage is cut together with Steadicam footage. If a scene goes from smooth Steadicam shots to all of a sudden handheld, then it gives the viewer an indication that the tone of the story is about to change and I love that,” he said.

Recently, millions of viewers around Australia got to see McLachlan’s work on their tv screens on the season premiere of The Voice Australia. The iconic singing competition is similar to the American format, where four celebrity judges blindly listen to contestants, looking to find the best voices to fill their team that they then coach. The contestants then battle it out throughout the weeks until one lucky artist is crowned “The Voice”. The most recent season in Australia features judges Delta Goodrem, Kelly Rowland, Boy George, and Guy Sebastian, global superstars that McLachlan worked closely with on the project.

“I think The Voice is a unique talent show in that the initial auditions are purely based off the singing ability of the performer, not on their looks. Too many talent shows focus only on the physical show of the performance and I think so many talented singers get overlooked because they don’t meet society’s image of what a pop star should look like. I also like the fact that each performer that makes it past auditions gets to choose which celebrity judge they want to be mentored by. This sets The Voice format apart from the rest and allows the viewer to look behind the curtain at the training and mentoring that takes place between each contestant and their celebrity mentor,” said McLachlan.

McLachlan was in charge of shooting the opener for the season, which featured the four judges singing Phil Collins’ iconic hit “In The Air Tonight.” Before the shoot, McLachlan sat down with Director of Photography Gregoire Liere and Director Harry Hunter to discuss the storyboard. There were a number of CGI elements they wanted to include into the edit as the whole sequence had a futuristic look and feel. For McLachlan, this meant leaving extra space in certain frames for special effects elements to take place.

On top of this, each celebrity judge had a different setting and required specific lighting, but the Steadicam moves stayed relatively the same for each scene. McLachlan was often finding ways to find the shots more dynamic. At one point, while the team was waiting for lighting to be adjusted with Boy George, he grabbed Liere’s attention and showed him a shot he had in mind where he rolled the camera from left to right as he pushed in on Boy George performing. The shot made it into the final cut and is extremely captivating.

“I think the large-scale nature of the shoot is what I liked most about the project. We had a different set for each of the judge’s performances and then an additional set where all four of them performed together. This allowed Gregoire and I to create a specific look for each judge in their environment. We also had a large lighting and camera support crew at our disposal, so we were able to implement lighting changes quite quickly without holding everyone up. It was also fun to work with the judges as they were professional and didn’t need too much direction or practice which allowed myself and Gregoire to get the most out of each shot,” McLachlan described.

The Voice Australia premiered on May 19th, 2019 and raked in almost two million viewers, one of the week’s most watched programs. McLachlan’s tremendous work for the opener became a hit online, with over 500,000 views on YouTube alone. It is a remarkable achievement and shows just how adept he is behind the camera.

“It was a great feeling being able to start the new season of The Voice Australia with a sequence that I was directly a part of. I think it is an incredible achievement. Our opener sequence with the judges helped set a high standard for the rest of the season of the show which I am stoked about. I think everyone involved in the production did an incredible job and should be very proud of what we achieved,” said McLachlan.

The Voice Australia is on 7 p.m. Sunday, 7:30 p.m. Monday, and 7:30 p.m. Tuesday on Nine Network in Australia. Be sure to check it out, and in the meantime, watch the Season 8 Opener here.

Hong Kong’s Samuel Lam gives musical life to new Chinese television series

Samuel Lam was born with a large birthmark on the right side of his face and spent much of his childhood alone because of it. Growing up in Hong Kong, it was hard for him, being a loner, but when he was 12 years of age, his sister bought him a guitar and his whole life changed. Music became a way to express himself, changing his personality and giving him something to connect with others.

Now, Lam is an industry leading composer and orchestrator is his home country and abroad. He has worked on multi-million-dollar blockbusters, such as Crazy Alien, to award-winning films like Mommy’s Girl. He has scored dozens of short films, and has many exciting projects on the way, including Paramount’s Playing with Fire, starring John Cena, Judy Greer and Keegan-Michael Key, directed by Andy Fickman, and Detective Chinatown, a 12 episode web-series, produced and written by Chen Sicheng, the director of the feature film of the same name, which generated over $600 million USD at the box office.

Lam is known all over the world for his talent, and recently worked on the highly anticipated Chinese series Paratrooper Spirit. The show is about a team of paratroopers with actual combat as their training ground, as they push hard to level up their fighting abilities and complete different missions. Set in the foreground of military reform, the story follows military men like Zhang Qi and Qi Xiao Tian. To develop an air force that can compete in the global stage, a special team called Guo Gai Tou has gathered. After the initial adjustment period, Guo Gai Tou began fighting wars in the North and South and challenging greater enemies. Warriors from Guo Gai Tou who are dispatched to other teams become aces in the field.

“It is a good way to increase understanding and knowledge about the military through the influence of media and entertainment. This show has a really interesting military service theme, the paratrooper,” said Lam.

Working on a series is far different than a feature film, and Lam was eager to work on his first television show with Paratrooper Spirit and working in television in China differs greatly from America. Rather than getting each episode weekly, as the U.S. does things, Lam got every episode of the show at once. Although there is a greater time crunch with this method, Lam likes knowing how the entire story is developed to orchestrate the score accordingly. He was given all 35 episodes of the season to work on and began by watching each one. Then he and his team started developing essential thematic materials such as main theme and melodies for characters that worked with each and every episode and helped to tell the story.

“It is very challenging working on a TV Show. Because of the large amount of content, you have to be very organized, and work at a super-fast pace. I had to arrange all kinds of music genres, from action orchestra, to rock and romantic pop song, and that was really fun,” said Lam.

It takes an extremely broad skill-set to orchestrate for a television show, and Lam possesses just that. He arranged hundreds of minutes of music for Paratrooper Spirit that will continue to be played over the show’s run, with millions hearing his work, and he couldn’t be more excited.

Paratrooper Spirit is currently being promoted in China and will be released in September 2019 on a major television network in the country. Be sure to keep an eye out for it.

Mix Engineer Jordan Oorebeek works with emerging Canadian pop icon Jordan Waller

With the infinite possibilities that music offers, no two days are the same for Jordan Oorebeek, an immensely talented and sought-after recording engineer, mix engineer, and producer in Canada. Every day has the same ultimate goal; make excellent art, but the unending variables of songs, personalities, studios, instruments, gear and glitches makes every day have its own unique challenges and rewards. He is constantly trying to put a moving puzzle together, and sometimes, he does not even know what it is supposed to look like until he takes a step back. When he has that “ah-ha!” moment, that adrenaline rush is why he loves what he does so much.

Oorebeek is known for his work with many prominent musicians in Canada, including Chris Buck Band, Wes Mack, George Canyon, and many more. He has made a significant mark in Canada’s country music scene, with many of his projects being nominated for CCMAs, and he was awarded with the 2018 British Columbia Country Music Association Recording Professional of the Year Award. For Oorebeek, however, it isn’t about awards or recognition; he simply just enjoys what he does.

“I love to create contrast and dynamics in my productions. I often employ bold transitions between a softly sung pre chorus with just an acoustic guitar, into a full band chorus with the singer belting out. I believe it’s this kind of contrast that we as humans love in every great story. Creating dynamic highs and lows in songs helps to mimic the emotional experience in life that makes us connect with music so deeply. My productions are more often than not very “hi-fi” and polished in nature, but I’ve also worked on many projects where a stripped down more raw and vulnerable approach was what the song needed. I know a lot of producers who really impart ‘their’ sound to a record, but that’s not really my style. My role as a producer is to be a creative liaison for the artist’s vision. I think it’s important to know when to stay out of the way and when to guide,” said Oorebeek.

Oorebeek’s success is not limited to the country music genre and has worked with many artists spanning across genres from electro-pop to rock. He recently collaborated with pop singer Jordan Waller on his newest album. Oorebeek loves mixing pop/dance songs, so when he first heard Waller’s music, he was really looking forward to working in this style. Waller’s music, although very pop driven, had elements of real drums, acoustic guitar and electric guitar, and Oorebeek loved that.

Before he starts mixing, Oorebeek always listens to the rough mix. It gives him cues and insight into what the producer’s vision is for the song. He finds it is a way of learning about the artist without them actually being there. When he began working on Waller’s music, he once again started in such a way. Then he began mixing.

A mix can make or break a great song, so when Oorebeek was mixing Waller’s music, he was always focusing on what elements in the mix were essential to bring forward. Which synths had a rhythm to them that gave him a feeling? What was the relationship between the kick and snare that made him want to move? How dark should the vocal be to match the tone of the lyric? He kept these questions in mind as he worked and paid close attention to all the elements in the tracks, making choices based on his experience.

“I always impart a bit of myself into every mix based on my personal taste. I think that’s the reason I was approached to mix these songs. I loved being creative with the use of effects in Jordan’s mixes,” said Oorebeek.

“This Feeling” was Waller’s first release and also his first single to chart. Oorebeek is extremely proud to have been a part of the success. Oorebeek worked on several more singles for Waller, whose debut album was released in February of this year.

“It’s always special when a debut single is received well right out the gate, especially as an unsigned, independent artist. You can never really predict how radio is going to receive a song, but while working on “This Feeling” I felt there was something special about it. It’s great when that gut feeling I get is affirmed by commercial success,” he concluded.

Producer Jamly Yang shoots in stunning locations for award winning commercial

One of the most life changing events in Jamly Yang’s life occurred when she was only a child and watched a feature film for the first time. She was transfixed by what she saw, not only by the story, but how everything looked so real. She remembers being convinced that the action shots and detailed war scenes were actually happening in front of her eyes and had to be consoled by her mother. After the movie finished, she became obsessed with the idea of one day making films of her own, with impactful stories that could touch audiences.

Now, Yang does just that, as a celebrated producer in her home country and abroad. Working on acclaimed films like Step Out, The Screenwriter in the Restroom, Billy’s Bear, and many more, Yang has combined her passion for storytelling with her determined mindset.

Yang has also worked with internationally recognized brands, such as Nike and Doritos, on many revenue generating commercials. Just last year, she worked on a commercial for Alpha Browser, an interactive mobile browser and all-in-one tool. The commercial is a powerful video that shows how Alpha Browser can help you in your daily life.

“I like how the commercial approaches it’s idea, instead of just introducing the product, which is what most tech companies would do, it shows people’s daily life, making the audience relate to the product,” said Yang.

Shooting the commercial involved a great deal of travelling between locations for the cast and crew, and Yang was in charge of organizing it all. She planned everything, from the hotel booking, to casting, to the budget, and even assisted with shooting when necessary.

“I loved the pretty location we shot in. What is different about commercials from film is the beauty of every frame. We can show a lot of pretty landscapes and use them to draw the audience’s attention. This is great for me because I love to travel, and on commercials you do a lot of it,” she said.

Under Yang’s leadership as the producer, the commercial went on to win several awards, including Best Commercial at the Calcutta International Cult Film Festival in both 2018 and 2019. It was also distributed internationally by ATK technology, directly contributing to sales for the product. Yang could not be prouder of what she and her team achieved, and as a fan of the Alpha Browser, she truly believed in the message she was putting out there.

“I like how it is designed. Every button is very clear and easy to understand. Compared to many of the other major browsers out on the market, Alpha Browser is more personalized. It’s more like your own account rather than just a browser. Whenever you use it, you feel at home, not in the internet ocean,” she said.

Yang has worked incredibly hard to get to where she is today, determined to achieve her childhood dream. Now that she has done so, she says the hard work doesn’t stop, and in order to continue her success, she treats every new project as a learning experience, constantly staying a student in an ever-changing world.

“This is an industry where you can’t expect fast success,” she said. “I guess just like every industry, there is nothing easy, and being passionate is the key. If you are still full of energy and love what you do after a long day, then don’t give up. Go for it and fear nothing.”

Watch the Alpha Browser commercial here.

 

 

Canada’s Evan Marsh goes up North for Netflix’s new hit series

Growing up in Woodstock, Ontario, Evan Marsh often found himself going through the VHS tapes in his father’s music/entertainment store. He would pick multiple movies and go home at night and watch them non-stop, learning them word-for-word. Even at a young age, he had a natural ability to understand people and their emotions, with an innate talent for mimicking voices and characters. Such a combination of skills left only one option for Marsh, and he still to this day felt he was destined to become an actor.

Now, Marsh is an industry-leading actor in Canada, having starred in many of the country’s hit films and television shows that have gone on to great international success. Most recently, audiences all over the world can see him star in DC’s newest blockbuster Shazam! and the critically-acclaimed film Giant Little Ones that is currently in theatres. His resume is filled with similar projects, having starred in the hit comedy The Space Between and the award-winning movie The Journey Is the Destination.

“I have come to learn that I have a very unique style of acting. Most people have their hit, be it ‘serious’ or ‘the villain’, etc. However, I take a lot of pride in saying I don’t have a particular hit. I enjoy surprising an audience by bringing humor to a dark scene or vice-versa. I consider myself skilled at being able to bring multiple ‘hits’ to one role without making it seem tacky or overdone. I believe it is a main reason for my success today,” said Marsh.

Also a star on the small-screen, Marsh has been in many popular television shows, including the CBC’s newest hit, Northern Rescue. After the death of his wife Sarah, John West (William Baldwin) packs up his three children and transports them from their hectic urban life to his small northern hometown to take command of the local search-and-rescue service. Once there, the family struggles with their new surroundings, new friends, and accepting Sarah’s death. The children’s aunt (Kathleen Robertson), helps them and John heal as she copes with the loss of her sister and her desire to have her own family. The series from Don Carmody Television (DCTV) was created by David Cormican, Dwayne Hill and Mark Bacci.

“This story deals with an abrupt death in the West family, which is unfortunately a situation many families find themselves in. It also deals with moving forward and continuing with your life after a bump in the road. I believe a story like that is incredibly important because anyone can find hope in that. There are so many stories about superheroes and wizards, which are great in their own way, but it is nice to have a family-based drama for people to relate to,” said Marsh.

In Northern Rescue, Marsh plays Henry, a charming young man who connects Maddie West, John’s teenage daughter, with her new home of Turtle Bay Island. He immediately sparks an interest in her. He treats her like a princess and wants to be her boyfriend. Throughout the series, he become quite close with her and her family and ultimately plays a major role in the series finale with her and her father John.

Henry takes Maddie from feeling like an outcast to loving the small town, and also acts as the perfect comedic relief for a show that is otherwise dark and dramatic. Every show in this genre needs someone to make you smile and laugh to even out the sadness, and Henry is that guy; Marsh was the perfect actor to play him, ready for the task, knowing he had to be both funny and sincere. In the end, he took the role and soared, completely enchanting audiences with his portrayal and becoming a fan-favorite.

“This show was filmed in Parry Sound, Ontario, which is a beautiful place to live. I was there for the better part of four months and I loved every second of it. It allowed me and the rest of the cast to really feel like we were in the fictional town of ‘Turtle Island Bay’ while living there. Also, the cast and I became closer than I ever have on any other project. We lived in the same house and became like a family,” said Marsh.

Northern Rescue premiered March 1st, 2019 on CBC in Canada and is distributed internationally on Netflix. On top of resonating with fans all over the world, it has received tremendous critical acclaim, being listed as a must-see rising show on TVTIME, among others.

“It is very rewarding knowing Northern Rescue has had such a warm welcome from fans. I think my fellow cast members did such an amazing job with each of their characters and it really shows. The show has so much heart that it isn’t surprising how beautiful and touching the final product ended up being. Here is to seeing more Henry on Northern Rescue down the road,” said Marsh.

Northern Rescue is available on Netflix around the world. Binge-watch the entire first season to get caught up on the drama and check out Marsh’s captivating portrayal of Henry.

 

Actor Kevin Clayette is stuck in a dystopian future in ‘Doktor’

Headshot Kevin Clayette (Photograph -Lauren Orrell)
Kevin Clayette, photo by Lauren Orrell

As a seasoned and celebrated actor, Kevin Clayette still tries to approach his craft, and his life, from the mindset of a child, by always being open to and excited by new experiences, and to love and believe like a kid. With this approach, every time he steps onto a film set, he is excited by the opportunity to play make believe and tell stories. He gets to be that little five-year-old that is always inside of him, not caring what others think and simply enjoying his life. For this New Caledonia native, there is no greater sense of joy.

At only 25, Clayette has already had a formidable career, becoming a recognized leader in Australia’s entertainment industry. Audiences everywhere recognize him from the long running soap opera Neighbours, in which he played fan favorite Dustin Oliver, and in the award-winning feature film Emo the Musical, in which he showed off his versatility as a triple-threat.

Another hit on Clayette’s resume came with the 2015 science fiction horror flick Doktor. Shot at the legendary Fox Studios in Australia where many popular films, including The Matrix, have been filmed, this award-winning film tells the story of an ancient man who is awake during surgery, triggering an hallucination, but also an allusion of a disturbing new reality.

“I liked that even though this story is set in a dystopian world and therefore quite far fetched from our current reality, it deals with themes such as money and power that are very real in our world. By talking about the reality of those issues, of those vices, we allow very important conversations to happen. Projects like these make you think and question our society and yourself. It’s a very interesting topic to reflect on,” said Clayette. “What does money do to you? Would you rather live a happy and fulfilled but short-lived life, or a lonely but long life thanks to money and corruption?”

In Doktor, Clayette plays the lead character of Gulham. In the dystopian world, Gulham is taken from the ones he loves after receiving a mysterious phone call. During that phone call, he made a deal with the devil and agreed to give his life in exchange for his family and loved one’s safety. He is then mistreated and drugged and dragged into a room before the film’s big reveal. Gulham is very ambiguous, but he is a good man, trying to do whatever it takes to save his family and loved ones. He is very brave.

Clayette knew that as the star of the film, he had to put everything he had into creating an authentic and captivating performance. Every morning, he would go through the entire script and storyboard before going on set, and every evening after leaving he would focus on creating the backstory for his character, imagining what he had been through, and then visualise what the next day would look like.

Clayette also had to prepare for his many emotional scenes, needing to portray a devastated character who sacrificed his life and knew he would never see his family again. In another scene, he was dragged down a corridor on a leash like a dog, and he had to show that hopelessness just with facial expressions. Such a challenge was exciting for the actor, who exceeded all expectations.

“Everyone in the crew was absolutely lovely, from the director to the producer to the makeup artists. It was very challenging emotionally on many levels to shoot some of the scenes I had in the movie. I liked having to get in the mindset and shoes of someone that lives a completely different life than the one I have,” he said.

Clayette had to portray a vastly emotional and dynamic performance despite the role being action focused with minimal dialogue. Using only his body language, he put everything he had into the role, creating many intense and dramatic moments in the film that greatly contributed to its later success.

Doktor was screened at many prestigious international festivals around the world. It took home Best Experimental Short Film at the Cutting Edge International Film Festival and was also selected to be showcased within the open competition category of AACTA’s Social Shorts (the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts). Clayette still feels honored by the film’s vast success.

“I’m really proud of this project and the hard work that everyone put in. It’s incredible to know that independent movies with smaller budgets can still have such an impact on our world,” he concluded.