Tag Archives: Spanish Talent

Victor Osorio On Living to Write

Victor Osorio is part of the 0.1 per cent of the general population that suffers from a rare neurological disease characterized by recurrent, severe headaches. The disease is called Cluster Headaches, but sufferers often refer to their condition as “Suicide Headaches” due to the often insurmountable pain that it causes. Osorio, on the other hand, sees his Cluster Headaches as the driving force behind his unwavering passion to write. Despite the massive amounts of pain and suffering that he has endured over time, he has only grown stronger and more determined to enlighten the world with his ideas. For the Spanish-native, writing is his reason to wake up in the morning, and although it isn’t the simplest profession to master, he has done so with ease. He doesn’t write because he wants to share something, he writes because he has something to share, and he has crafted a remarkable career around it.

When Osorio was a child, his parents deterred him from spending too much time in front of the television. As a result, he became an avid reader. He was fascinated by each author’s ability to awaken his imagination in ways they might not have ever intended. He loved learning the various styles and techniques that his favorite writers would use and he was inspired to develop his own unique methods. Today, the renowned writer can be credited as being the successful mastermind behind works like his children’s book, Cosas Que Nadie Sabe (translated in English to: Things Nobody Knows). He also worked for the longest running child and teen magazine, Dibus! Magazine, as a children’s comic writer for their hit feature, Alienados. Osorio’s talents, however, are not limited to writing for children’s publications. When he expanded his reach into the television and film industry, he lent his expertise to the award-winning web series, Hollywood and later earned himself a position working for Origo Media.

 For Osorio, working with Origo Media is unlike anything he had ever worked on in the past. The job requires him to write short commercials and corporate videos for Origo Media’s clients. In addition, he is expected to deliver material on a weekly basis, according to very strict deadlines. Fortunately, he thrives under pressure and can produce high quality content in a very short period of time. The videos that he writes, which appear mainly online and on television in Central and South America, would not be the success that they are today without Osorio’s unprecedented ability to turn a minor concept into a piece of artwork. In his time spent working with Origo Media, Osorio has written over 200 commercials and corporate videos, as well as a spec pilot.

When asked about his position at Origo Media, Osorio would tell you that he felt lucky to expand his skill set and learn to succeed under a different kind of pressure. “Working at Origo Media was a big deal for me because it allowed me to work on a series of projects with the same people for a year. By now, I consider myself to be very skilled at being concise and to the point, without sacrificing flavor, entertainment, and quality writing. Working on commercials really brings those skills to light and being able to put them to use within the context of this job has been extremely satisfying,” said Osorio.

Those who have worked with Osorio, however, would tell you luck has little to do with it. Luiz Santiago, who is the CEO at Origo Media, considers Osorio to be an invaluable asset to his company. “Victor is a very good writer with a big imagination and his command of creative writing techniques highlight his prowess as a writer. He also takes any potential set and post-production complications into account when developing his scripts to make everyone else’s work easier. Beyond that, he writes interesting, dynamic characters for our actors to explore,” told Santiago. Given the fact that Origo Media creates commercials and corporate videos in Central and South America, it is also important to bridge the gap between American and Hispanic culture in their work. Osorio’s life experiences allow him to do so flawlessly, in a way that resonates well with his audiences. For this reason, Santiago went on to say that, “Victor’s Spanish heritage and culture give him a unique perspective into American culture that infuses his work.”

Working at Origo Media has added a new and interesting dynamic to Osorio’s career. His eagerness to write and his passion for spreading his ideas across the world make him particularly open to expanding his horizons into new mediums and genres wherever possible. He enjoys stepping out of his comfort zone and striving for excellence in each new territory that he embarks on. A quick glance into the future of Osorio’s career looks bright. Recently, his children’s book was translated into English and eventually, he hopes to see it on as many bookshelves as possible. He is also working on a second children’s book, as well as a feature film script. He has no shortage of ideas in his brain, and will continue to craft them for success. From the outside looking in, Osorio writes for a living but if you ask him, Osorio simply lives to write.

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Rhythmic gymnastics coach Ana Perez helps young Spanish athletes soar to success

Rhythmic gymnastics is so much more than simply waving a ribbon. It is about precision. It is a sport and an art form. Athletes must be in incredible shape, but be trained in ballet and other styles of dance. Spain’s Ana Perez knows this well. She is both a successful gymnast and a celebrated coach, lending her talents to help train future generations of gymnasts while still remaining in the shape of an athlete ready to step on stage.

Perez’s coaching abilities have earned her a reputation as one of Spain’s best. She is internationally sought-after, and has worked with many award-winning athletes, helping them get to where they are.

As a coach, it is very similar to being an athlete, but on the other side of the competition. I still train five days per week plus one or two days more on the weekends for competitions. Really, it’s different because you have to convey your knowledge to the girls, but I love it. The opportunity to teach girls since they were young is amazing, I enjoy a lot with my work and also, I learn a lot every day from them,” she said.

Earlier this year, Perez showed Spain and the world the caliber of coach she is while training Aitana Ramos for the Absolute Spanish World Championship, the highest level of competition that the country offers. Ramos was trained for her individual season by three coaches, as this is a rule regulated by the Spanish Federation of rhythmic gymnastics in the beginner category in the Absolute Spanish Championship. Together with two other coaches, Perez trained her with the purpose of classifying herself in the preliminary round, since she was provincial champion thanks to the sum of her three exercises. She ended up taking second place in the autonomic phase and she classified herself for the Individual Spanish Championship in June.

“You feel very proud because what I have learned since I was little, which is to do gymnastics, is now what I teach and I do so with the advances of the rhythmic gymnastics code as established by the International Gymnastics Federation. It was extremely satisfying. For Aitana, it was the first time she learned with the maces that I taught her, and her improvement was very remarkable. She performed a great competition, both in the exercise of maces and in the rest of the hands-free and ball exercises. In this way, Aitana was selected the following year by the technification team of the Valencian Community,” Perez described.

Perez was responsible for making the choreography of juggling clubs, looking for the music and creating the choreography in order to obtain strong results. She supervised the rest of the choreography with ball and hands-free. By doing so, Ramos got the best possible position with the sum of the three apparatuses, achieving very high results of the 50 beginner gymnasts that participated.

Perez’s fellow coaches, Alicia Gaspar, who trained Ramos with the ball, and Julia Marin, who trained her in hands-free, knew Perez’s contributions were pivotal to the gymnast’s success. The two of them say Perez’s choreography was “perfect” for Ramos, and she knows exactly what the sport should be. They describe her as an excellent coworker who is essential to their team, always giving advice and modifying choreography to make it the best it can be. However, they weren’t the only people impressed with Perez’s work.

“Ana is very friendly with the girls. They love her and also her work. Ana’s work during the year is very important for our Club because we have a lot of girls to pay attention to, not just during the midweek at the training, but also at the competitions during the weekend, when we have to travel with the gymnasts around different cities and places and we have to take care, motivate and have fun with the girls. Our job is our passion and Ana is the reflection of that. She always has a smile in her face and is always creating a good work environment,” said Ines Gaspar, Coach of the Morvedre Rhythmic Gymnastics Club.

Perez had seen success at the same competition three years before, bringing her team to victory and taking first place. However, this year she coached an individual rather than a team. In the individual competition, the five best gymnasts in each community of Spain in each category are chosen to compete. It is at a very high level where the best gymnasts go. Every gymnast wants to be part of it. Although Ramos did not win, Perez could not have been prouder of the young athlete.

“Aitana was not a winner but both my teammates, Julia, Alicia and I, we were very happy, since Aitana had managed to be among the best in Spain doing a great championship in her three choreographies. Aitana had small mistakes that are normal because she is a gymnast who is learning and because of her young age, because she was only 12, she lacked experience which she will gradually acquire,” said Perez.

With talent like Perez’s, we can continue to expect greatness from this coach. Countries around the world are looking to have her train their rhythmic gymnasts, and there is no doubt that she will continue to see them soar to success.

 

Photo from left to right: Marta Belloch, María Ripoll, Ariadna Moya, Daniela Sese, Aitana Ramos, Alba Acosta, Ana Perez

Videographer Maria Aguado takes us back in time with Button Barcelona

Maria Aguado has always known she was meant to be a filmmaker. Since the age of seven, she wrote screenplays and made movies. At the time, just a small child in Barcelona, she filmed her dolls, editing the footage, unaware of what she was really doing. She grew up holding a camera, and to this day, nearly twenty years later, that remains true.

Aguado’s unique eye has greatly contributed to the success of many brands who seek her services. Just last year, the company Button Barcelona reached out to the videographer to make a promotional and informative video about the brand that would be played at a Button Barcelona event, as well as two other videos to be used to promote the brand on social media.

“I really liked the romanticism that creates Button Barcelona and I wanted to be a part of it. They emphasize how everything worked in the old times, enjoying every step with serenity and a slower rhythm. I was happy to express this through audio-visual,” said Aguado.

Button Barcelona is a company inspired by the way people used to live sixty years before the industrial revolution in a small village in Barcelona. They sell all type of products with one thing in common: bringing back the traditional methods of production and elaboration with hand-made products. As a videographer and editor, Aguado had to transmit this idea to the audience. She filmed and edited three videos for Button Barcelona. The first one was a series of interviews explaining the story of Button Barcelona. The second was the “making of” of the photo shoot. For the third video, she edited the previous two videos together, for the Button Barcelona event. All three were posted and used on social media as their marketing campaign.

“The shooting was really fun. We immediately became a good team from the start. The event was also amazing, my video was screened and we were all there, overwhelmed by the story the video shows and the whole experience,” Aguado described.

While shooting, Aguado filmed the models in different parts of the village doing antiquated activities, such as washing clothes in a bucket of water, going to an antique cinema, and sewing clothes. She truly shows really the audience how these people used to live, emphasizing the essence of the company.

“Button Barcelona is everything that defines us, differentiates us and reaffirms our personality. That’s why I decided to select every single piece that showed a narrative in order to create a story inside a fashion video,” said Aguado. “Through the shooting and the editing, I transformed models into characters. This is the nice and tricky thing about editing, with just one look, a movement, a step, you can create a story, a narrative structure. The tricky part is to know when you are cutting a video and why, it all has to end up making sense in order to touch the audience. Also, remembering all the material in order to be fluent and creative. The brand’s idea is the opposite of frenetic; it’s all about taking your time to produce with love. I showed this by carefully selecting pieces of music and mixing them together. The rhythm plays a very important part too, music and video have to dance together.”

The final video is eight minutes long. It begins documentary style, interviewing the various people at Button Barcelona, and explaining the story behind the company. The final five minutes feature the “making of” from the photoshoots. Aguado perfectly blends the shots to the music, editing the cuts to the exact beat of the song. It does not appear to be a promotional video, but instead an artistic music video, where the models are simply people enjoying their life rather than working. The result is outstanding.

“Maria was given full freedom to create both videos and the result was even better than what we had expected. She is a very hard worker with a positive attitude and creative mind! Her creativity and passion for what she does is what makes her so good at it,” said Candelaria Turrens, CEO and Founder of Button Barcelona.

The three videos were crucial in branding Button Barcelona. They explain the company’s idea, and introduce the world to the members of the brands Button distributes. Without Aguado, the event would not have been the success that it was, and the brand itself could not have achieved what it has today. She captured the company’s essence through the lens of her camera.

“It felt like we were teleported to another time; the times Button Barcelona tries to keep in our lives. The story was clearly shown to the audience, they could feel the essence of the brand and really enjoyed it. The video was repeated every half an hour, people kept asking to see it over and over again. It was amazing,” Aguado concluded. “I believe I showed the value of the simple way people used to live, the romanticism of the old times, enjoying every step with happiness, calm and serenity.”