Category Archives: fashion

From the Pages of Magazines to his Most Recent Film “Il Sonnambulo” Rob McLoughlin Continues to Turn Heads

Spoke LJ 29-7-20150018 (1).jpg
Actor Rob McLoughlin featured in an ad for Spoke Pants

 

For English model-turned-actor Rob McLoughlin, the ability to embody a character comes genuinely and naturally. With a scope of work ranging from commercials to live theatre to feature films, this London based performer is grabbing the attention of industry leaders worldwide with his captivating charm and organic believability. Enthralled by the opportunity to get into the heads of characters both real and made up, McLoughlin has delivered memorable and unparallelled performances over the last six years that are enough to impress even  the toughest of critics.

McLoughlin’s roles have been as diverse as they have been challenging. He has played everything from the nerdy, hyperfocused computer technician in BBC’s Micro Men to a cheeky and daring journalist in the award winning feature film Il Sonnambulo and a hostage-taking, weapon-wielding gangster in Sam Walker‘s black-and-white noir film, Suspect 13.

While he currently works predominantly in film, McLoughlin’s roots began in the live theatre, where he worked for eight years at the Royal Opera House in London, where in addition to acting, he brought his stunt and combat skills to the stage.

“I’ve worked with world renowned director David McVicar many times,” McLoughlin recalls of his time at the theatre. “One of the things I worked with him on was Le Nozze Di Figaro, or, ‘The Marriage of Figaro,’ which won several awards. We actually devised an opening scene during the overture which has never been done in the two hundred years of its production, so there’s a little bit of history there.”

With talent extending from the stage and onto both television and film screens across the globe, McLoughlin demonstrates his versatility and depth of skill wonderfully in Il Sonnambulo. Having already won “Best Horror Film” at Vancouver Web Fest and both “Best Cinematography” and “Best Director” at Seattle Web Fest, Il Sonnambulo is sure to win even more awards in 2016 as it is slated to travel to Buenos Aires Film Fest, Toronto Film Fest, New Media Film Fest and Montreal Web Fest where it has been chosen as an Official Selection. You can get a taste of the film through the trailer below:

 

 

The film, whose Italian title translates to “The Sleepwalker,” is gaining momentum in the film festival circuit for its macabrely gripping storyline. The feature tells the tale of photographer Atticus Hurst, a distraught though numb father of a missing girl, as he teams up with reporter and all around badass Roberto Aurelio to chase the scent of Il Sonnambulo, an ominously threatening boogeyman-like murderer who has been taunting Atticus over the past twenty years.

Proving that nothing is out of his wheelhouse, McLoughlin breathes life into the complex and peculiar character of the reporter superbly and naturally.  Before the shoot, McLoughlin sat down with director Doug Rath to develop more of a backstory for his character. While the backstory would never be directly mentioned in the film, the work that goes into character development bleeds through into every scene of the film and is instrumental to the overall success of the project. In fact, it is in large part due to McLoughlin’s dedication to the project that it is being seriously considered by many networks in the United States to further develop into a series.

 

Roberto Investigates.png
Still shot of Rob McLoughlin as Roberto in “Il Sonnambulo”

 

Able to pull from his own experiences, McLoughlin relates to his character, comparing Roberto’s dichotomy to that of an actor feigning confidence. “Roberto thinks that Atticus is completely mad, that this is all some spooky crap that Atticus has made up after too many absinthes. However, it’s all too enticing and could get him back on track professionally. I mean, who knows that feeling better than an actor right? Pretty much everything we do is a shot in the dark.”

It is this very confidence, willingness to take risks, and belief in the art that has gotten McLoughlin to where he is today. Never type-cast, McLoughlin proves his range and flexibility as he tackles role after role, some serious, some funny, and everything in between. For instance, he played a hostage-taking, bar-robbing, roughed-up gangster in Suspect13 and, while he says it’s “fun to play the bad guy,” his talents don’t end there. McLoughlin makes for a genuine and believable hopeless romantic in the six-part Mark’s and Spencer Valentine’s Day commercials.

“I can scrub up ok,” McLoughlin says with a smile. “I can don a suit or scruff up quite easily for a role. My normal style is jeans and a t-shirt. I’m witty, I’m intelligent; I was given a good brain and I like to use it. I’m relaxed. Maybe too much sometimes but I’m also professional. I do my job to the best of my abilities every time.”

Stopping at literally nothing to live out his dream, McLoughlin can be seen in a recent Audi commercial, strapped to a car travelling at 80mph down an airport runway in a hundred degree heat, reading a newspaper. “That was so much fun,” McLoughlin admitted, “I wanted to do it all week.”

With a passion met only by his charisma, talent, and motivation to succeed, Rob McLoughlin is an actor whose portrayals will not soon be forgotten.  The ability to take viewers on an emotional journey while maintaining their credibility and telling a story is truly the mark of a good actor, and McLoughlin demonstrates this with modesty and enthusiasm every single time.

 

Advertisements

Wardrobe Stylist Kirsten Reader Works on TIME’s Famous Cover

FullSizeRender

TIME Magazine is perhaps one of the most universally recognized magazines around the world. Steve Jobs, Princess Diana, Obama, Einstein, and JFK are just a few famous and world changing faces that have graced the covers of this prestigious publication. But with each every famous cover, there is a team behind it. 

Canadian fashion director and wardrobe stylist Kirsten Readers knows this, as she styled TIME’s July 2013 cover “How Can Service Save Us” for the magazine’s annual national service issue.

“I don’t think anyone would turn down an opportunity to work with a publication like TIME magazine. They are iconic and recognized around the world,” said Reader. “For me it was such an honor and an accomplishment I will always be proud of.

The TIME article featured military veterans to talk about what happens to them post service. 

“I had to source authentic United States Military fatigues that would have been worn during the current war in Afghanistan,” described Reader. “We had to ensure that we honored the veterans who were participating in the current crises, as that was the focus of the article.”

Although the TIME magazine editorial crew is located in New York City, the shoot took place at the Westside Studios in Toronto, and therefore Reader worked with a very small team.

“The photographer Andrew B Myers and I made sure we got the overall vision TIME had requested taken care of,” said Reader. “Working with Andrew and TIME was a dream come true. Everyone was an absolute pleasure and yet another job I felt lucky to be a part of.” 

Reader had her work cut out for her. Having the shoot in Toronto created some unexpected challenges. 

“Ensuring to source the correct military service fatigues here in Toronto was a bit of a challenge, but one I truly relished succeeding at,” she said.

And succeed she did. Reader’s styling caught the attention of many high profile people in the entertainment industry, and allowed her to increase her connections.

 “She achieved a cover profiling models as veterans in a respectful light dressed in authentic current military wardrobe,” said filmmaker and television producer Jonas Bell Pasht. “This level of respect for real veterans while still working on achieving a dynamic cover is why Kristen is so often sought after for these central and critical projects. She is not only capable of delivering the message but also helping to ensure it is done in the most memorable and respectful way.”

 “For any stylist to be selected to work on the cover of such a widely distributed and entrusted publication within the journalism world is a massive accomplishment as a stylist that cannot be undervalued or understated,” said Odessa Paloma Parker, the fashion editor of The Globe and Mail, one of Canada’s largest circulating newspapers. 

 Reader remembers the shoot as one of the quickest she ever participated on.

 “The shoot itself was a half day with a day of preparation prior to ensure we had lots to work with to do the veterans justice,” described Reader.

 The cover is something Reader can, and always will be, proud of.

 “This was an amazing project to be a part of,” said Reader. “TIME is an iconic publication and never one I thought I would have the chance to style for, as it is a news publication so it was truly a once in a lifetime opportunity.”

Q & A With Seasoned Stylist Patricia Lagmay

Q+A.jpg
Styled by: Patricia Lagmay. Photo by: Ian Lanterman.

 

Currently based out of Vancouver, Canada, Patricia Lagmay is a fashion stylist known for styling leading fashion editorials and esteemed lookbooks and campaigns. Her work with brands spans professional labels such as Priory, Samsung, Wings + Horns, and Aritzia, and her editorial spreads have been published by Hearst Media.

Lagmay spent time both abroad in Canada and locally in Los Angeles, where she was initially drawn to pursue a career in styling. Once just a place of work for Lagmay at the age of nineteen, the renowned stylist was represented by THEY Representation by the time she was twenty-one, and remained with the agency until 2012, when she began working exclusively with Aritzia.

While at Aritzia, she refined her talents and made a significant impact on the brand’s growth and development , with her role becoming more senior as time progressed. Lagmay contributed her innate skills to the retailer until 2015 as a lead stylist on their seasonal lookbooks, campaigns, and eCommerce catalogue. Most recently, for the past year and a half, she’s worked with the clothing line Priory, styling and art directing their Fall ’15, Spring ’16 and Fall ’16 collections.

Throughout her profession and on many occasions, she has established herself as an invaluable asset to the fashion industry. We recently had the chance to sit down with Lagmay and discuss a few of her crowning career highlights, which we’ve outlined in our exclusive, one-on-one interview below.

Where are you from originally?

I was born in the Philippines and lived there until I was 10. My family moved to LA and lived there for six years, and then relocated to Vancouver, where I’ve now lived for the past 11 years.

What inspired you to purse a career in styling?

This is going to sound like a cliché, but I don’t think I had a choice. I’ve been drawn to it since even before I realized it was a career.

 What types of platforms does your work span?

My work spans print and digital. I work on editorial stories for varying publications, alongside styling campaigns, lookbooks, and eCommerce for established and emerging brands.

Does your approach to styling differ from one platform to the next?

Print has a longer lead-time whereas digital is more or less immediate. This dictates what season the clothes I choose have to come from so that when the story hits, the clothes are available.

 Who are some of the top clients you’ve worked with?

I worked with Aritzia extensively for the last three years. I’ve also worked with Priory, Wings + Horns, Sitka, and Samsung, among others.

 In your opinion, what are some of the most important characteristics a stylist can possess?

You really have to love it. The decisions you make as you style won’t make any sense otherwise, since a lot of it is instinctual. You also have to be extremely organized. There are a lot of moving parts to a shoot and it takes a healthy dose of OCD to get everything done.

 How do you try to incorporate those qualities into your own styling?

I make sure to listen to my instincts. There can be a lot of cooks in the kitchen at times, and paired with the number of trends that arise every season, it’s easy to get caught up in styling to please the whole team. But as the stylist on set, you’ve been hired for your taste and opinion, so it’s important to know when to stick to your guns. As for being organized, I’m definitely a bit OCD so that part comes naturally!

Your journey with THEY Representation is a fascinating one. What was your first role with them?

I started out as an intern when I was 19 and eventually became the Head Booker and Marketing Manager, handling all bookings for the artists, dealing with production, and managing the agency’s brand. After a couple of years I was ready to move on from my role. Since I’d already been styling my own shoots, THEY’s owner and agent suggested that I jump over to the artist side instead and become a represented stylist on their roster.

 What about your time working with Aritzia? You were a stylist there for over three years. What were your main roles? Did your roles change as time went on?

The areas of the business that I worked on more or less remained the same, but my involvement with each of them progressed as the years went on. I worked on the brand’s seasonal lookbooks and campaigns, alongside styling (and often art directing) their extensive eCommerce catalogue.

 With Priory, how do your roles as a stylist and as an art director differ from one another? Similarly, how do they complement one another?

Technically speaking, a stylist is someone who deals primarily with the clothing—choosing which pieces to use, putting the looks together, and ensuring they look good on the model. An art director is someone who deals with all the creative facets of a shoot—from the photography, to the styling, to the hair and makeup, to the casting, all the way down to the posing. I find it difficult to not have an opinion on all of those different areas since each of them greatly impacts the final images. I can bring the best clothes in, but if what I have doesn’t work with what the hair stylist has chosen, or vice versa, it really doesn’t matter. In that sense, styling and art directing are very intertwined.

 Tell us a little bit about the Samsung commercial you worked on. Who did you collaborate with? What brands were incorporated into the shoot?

Samsung was looking to change their creative tonality and this commercial was their first step in that direction. We had an amazing international crew—the director and producers had flown in from Copenhagen, the clients from Seoul, the talent from the U.S. and Europe. My goal, along with everyone else’s, was to bring a sense of authenticity to the characters. To do this, I pulled from a variety of sources—from vintage stores to more contemporary brands such as Reigning Champ.

 What has been your most challenging project thus far, and how did successfully completing it help you grow as a stylist?

Each project’s been challenging in it’s own way so it’s hard to choose. Some have been a challenge from a creative perspective, some from a budget perspective. They’ve all worked out regardless, so I try to keep that in mind whenever I’m faced with another hiccup.

 What is one thing that people on the outside of the fashion industry would never suspect about being a stylist?

There are just as many unglamorous parts to the job as there are glamorous ones, if not more. From taping shoes, to dealing with customs, to trying anything to get a stain off of a garment – the list goes on.

 Why is having a stylist so important?

When it comes to shooting a brand’s lookbook or campaign, a stylist brings an important level of objectivity to the set. That outsider’s perspective combined with the designer’s vision is what brings the collection to life. A stylist also knows how to make the clothes look their best for the camera—which requires more trickery than you’d think.

Can you elaborate on a favorite project or two that you’ve worked on?

My favorite part is the mix of it all so I definitely can’t choose just one. Working on varying projects is what keeps the next one as interesting as the last.

 From where do you draw your inspiration?

It can come from anywhere—runway, the old lady walking down the street, a recent film, old editorials.

 What are your personal hobbies and interests outside of styling?

Eating. Good meals with good friends and I am a happy camper.

How would you describe your own sense of style and fashion when it comes to your own wardrobe?

I definitely have a uniform. Lots of nude, black, and navy, and not a whole lot of anything else.

What brands do you aspire to one day work with?

The Row, Celine, and Protagonist.

 What brand or client is up next on your agenda that you’ll be styling?

I don’t like to count my eggs before they hatch, so we’ll just have to wait and see.

Model in Focus: Axel Swan

Axel Swan
Axel Swan shot by Szilveszter Makó

In the world of modeling, having a certain look and being able to pull off many is crucial, and after seeing the photos and ad campaigns featuring British Italian male model Axel Swan, it is easy to see that the international heartthrob has that special something that turns heads.

Standing at 6’3” with glossy chin-length hair, a skinny frame and tattoos on his arms and legs, at first glance you might assume Axel is the typical bad boy, but in reality he is a fun loving, laid back guy who loves to play bass guitar, skateboard and create art using graphic design.

Like Cindy Crawford and many of the world’s most iconic models, Axel was originally ‘discovered’ at a mall at the ripe age of 15, but he didn’t take the fashion world seriously until several years later when, at the age of 21, he exchanged numbers with a booking agent he met at a bar. Finally ready to dote his natural beauty and gift for becoming various characters in front of the camera upon the modeling industry, Axel went on to sign with Barcelona’s Uniko Models and Two Management in the U.S., two of the world’s leading modeling agencies.  

The decision was certainly a wise one for the model, as he has since been tapped to work with some of the biggest and best photographers and most fashion-forward designers working in the industry today. 

“Modeling is a great way to get to know great and talented creative people, and it gives you the possibility to see places and travel more,” says Axel.  

Axel was featured as the main model in an ad campaign for renowned Japanese designer Junya Watanbe and iconic Spanish luxury brand Loewe where he modelled their rich collaborative collection of fine leathers and crisp denims; and boy did he do it with style!

The editorial was included in GQ Italia, in addition to being featured on the magazine’s website alongside the fashion video.The video shows close ups of Axel and the other models swaying, and slowly moving around in their gear, all while a clock ticks in the background, as if to imply that their apparel is “the bomb.”

You can check out the video below:

<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/73335431″>Loewe x Junya Watanabe</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/magmhi”>magmhi.com</a&gt; on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

Axel was also the driving force in a series of editorials entitled “Lucha Libre” where he sports the brilliant fashions of famed designer Barbara Sanchez Kane for Fucking Young magazine. The gifted model goes all out by wearing a variety of colorful fabrics and conveying emotions, while genuinely capturing the true spirit of the “Lucha Libre” traditions.

In astonishing contrast to the bright colors and looks he sported for the Sanchez Kane editorial, Axel went to the dark and melancholic side in a series of editorials entitled “Shiele Reloaded” for Papercut Magazine.

The focus of the fantastic high-art series, Axel perfectly resembled the characters from various turn of the century paintings by famed Austrian expressionist painter Egon Shiele; and what’s more, as he sports an array of styles from contemporary brands such as Myths and Munn, he manages to brilliantly blend the old and the new.

“I’d always been really shy and introverted growing up and I thought the industry was the right place where to force myself to show others my personality as well as getting to know talented individuals. I managed to improve my personality kicking away most of my shyness,” admits Axel.

His statement has proven to be undeniably true as his repertoire of work to date, which includes modelling hair products for Urban Tribe, premium handbags for Italian brand Catherinelle, colorful swim trunks for Evin Beachwear, and footwear for prominent Italian brand Cult shoes, reveal Axel as a cool, calm and confident hunk that we cannot help but be captivated by.

Although breaking out of his shell appears to have come rather effortlessly for the 23 year old model judging by his photos, nothing in the industry can put a model’s confidence to the test quite like strutting down the catwalk. And Axel has definitely not shied away from that aspect of the industry either. Walking for leading designers at the renowned Barcelona Fashion Week where he sported creations for esteemed fashion designer Krizia Robustella’s “Black & Gold Kings” show, Axel showed audiences and buyers alike that he is one model that not only knows how to nail the mark, but one that leaves us wanting more.

Whether it be a print ad or a runway show, Axel Swan is sure to please even the harshest of critics. The sought after and diversely talented model has a lot of campaigns set for release this year, but one that will unquestionably introduce him to those who aren’t familiar with his work yet is the upcoming campaign he shot for Coca-Cola, which is slated to hit billboards across international markets very soon.

 

Q & A with Leading Fashion Photographer Peter Tamlin

peterheadshot
Photographer Peter Tamlin

We are all born with unique gifts that make us different from the rest of the masses. Some know from an early age exactly what those gifts are, while others, arguably the majority, have to go through the sometimes grueling process of trial and error before their true ‘purpose’ shines through clearly.

Today, Toronto-based photographer Peter Tamlin is sought out by major companies like cosmetic leaders including MAC, CoverGirl, Revlon and Clairol to jewelry designers such as Dean Davidson and award-winning stylists like Caffrey Van Horne to use his creative eye to capture their products and designs for all the world to see. But, if you asked Tamlin back in high school how his life would look in 10 years, chances are he wouldn’t have predicted himself having a career as an internationally celebrated photographer, but that’s exactly what has happened. After discovering his love for photography at the age of 19, he dove in full force and hasn’t looked back since.

Aside from the impressive list of clients Tamlin has shot for to date, he has also had his personal photography work featured in gallery shows including the “Vision-Perceptions of Light” exhibition at the Warren G. Flowers Gallery in Montreal, Canada.

In 2011 he earned the award for Best Fashion & Beauty Photography from the prestigious Applied Arts Photography & Illustration Awards for the intriguing black and white photo he took of Tea that is featured below. The way he endows the shot with a feeling of movement and the whimsy of a fairy tale make it a difficult photo to take our eyes away from.

PeterTamlinAward2011
Enter a caption

Tamlin has shot editorials for a diverse collection of some of the most read magazines around the world including Fashion Magazine, Plastik Magazine, Lush Luxury Magazine, Fantastics Magazine and countless others. While he is continually pushing the boundaries of the mainstream with his personal photography style, what has made him such a success in his field is the fact that he is able to strike a balance between what his clients want and what he finds creatively inspiring.

Regardless of whether they are fashion models donning new designs or products for the various companies that hire him to shoot their ad campaigns, Tamlin is a miracle worker when it comes to creating the perfect lighting to capture his subjects. His unique ability to light a model’s skin in a way that glows effortlessly while still looking natural was a huge draw factor for Shoppers Drug Mart, which hired him to shoot their Glowing Skin campaign in 2013.

To find out more about photographer Peter Tamlin, what inspires him and how he got to where he is today, make sure to check out our interview below. You can also check out more of his work through his website: http://www.petertamlin.com/

You can also connect with him on Facebook here.

Where are you from and how did you first begin learning photography?

PT: I was born in Scarborough, but raised in a small town named Stouffville, both in Ontario, Canada. I’m now based in Toronto.

When I was 18, one of the first friends I met in Toronto was a photographer and was an assistant to famed photographer David Lachappelle. My friend would always show me David’s photography books and expose me to the many types of pop-culture photography coming out of New York. When I was 19, I bought my first 35mm film camera and began shooting and experimenting.

Are you self-taught or did you go to school to study photography?

PT: When I was 23, I moved to Montreal and enrolled in the Dawson Institute of Photography. It was a two year program and I graduated at the top of my class.

What is it about photography that first inspired you to pursue it as a profession?

PT: Basically, I love the idea of being creative and creating artwork that is captivating and original. Professionally, I detested the idea of working a 9-5 job and doing the same thing everyday. I wanted a career where I could always be setting new goals and where there is no limit to the success I could have.

I also wanted flexibility with my schedule and to be able to work when and where I want. I love the idea of being able to travel as well.

Can you tell our readers about some of the projects you’ve shot?

PT: In Jan 2015, I was hired as photographer for a campaign and hair competition shoot for Aveda Canada and specifically for Civello, which is an Aveda Salon in Toronto. Over the course of two days we shot 7 different models, each with different hairstyles. The photos were used in a campaign and also entered in the NAHA’s (North American Hair Styling Awards) and also the Constessa’s, which is a Canadian hairstyling competition. The entry was named a finalist in the CONTESSA Awards for Canadian Salon Team.

I was hired for this shoot by Aveda Canada’s Creative Director, Kristjan Hayden. I worked directly with Kristjan to develop the direction for the shoot. The concept was based on movement and motion of the hair, so with the specific lighting I developed with Kristjan, I was able to use a special effect to illustrate the movement.

I believe the reason I was asked to be involved in this project was because of my unique creative vision and my ability to bring original and captivating ideas to this project. Hair photography is not only about showing the detail in the hairstyles, but also about presenting the hairstyles in creative and interesting ways. I think the specific lighting, set, special effects and retouching treatment I produced for this shoot are extremely unique, interesting and effective.

In 2013 I was hired to produce the Glowing Skin advertising campaign for Canada’s largest drugstore chain, Shoppers Drug Mart. For the Glowing Skin Campaign, we shot 4 different models in one day. The purpose of the shoot was to showcase clean, healthy, glowing skin. The photos were used in a national advertising campaign, appearing on billboards, in stores, newspapers, magazines, online and many other advertising outlets.

I was hired again as photographer for Shopper’s Drug Mart in 201 for their 30 Days of Beauty campaign. We shot 30 different models ranging in age from 16-60, over seven days. The purpose of the campaign was to showcase diversity in beauty. Again, the photos were used in a national advertising campaign appearing on billboards, in stores, newspapers, magazines, online and many other advertising outlets, as well. Each model was featured for each day in September 2014.

It was extremely important for these projects that the lighting capture the detail on the skin and the texture and colour of the products used. The lighting I used for both shoots was designed specifically to the needs of each campaign. For the Glowing skin campaign, it was very important that the skin looks healthy and glowing. The lighting that I designed incorporated many different light sources from multiple directions giving the skin enhanced luminosity.

For the 30 Days of Beauty campaign, it was very important that we showcased diversity in beauty, but in many different ethnicities and ages. The lighting that I used was softer and more flattering than standard beauty lighting. This meant that the light helped highlight and enhance each model’s own beauty.

Early in 2015 I was hired by Dean Davidson, a top Toronto based Canadian jewelry designer, to shoot his spring/summer campaign. Being the first time I had a chance to shoot for Dean, I wanted to do something completely original for him, so I suggested that we have the model pose in a pool of water. The model’s name was Hannah Donker from Elite Models in Toronto.

DEAN DAVIDSON SS15

Then in October Dean approached me to shoot his fall/winter campaign. Again, I wanted to do something original, so I suggested shooting in a set of mirrors. The model’s name was Emily Van Raay and she’s represented by Anita Norris Models in London, ON. I worked with a very talented team with Greg Wencel doing the hair and makeup, and George Antonopoulos as the stylist. Both shoots were a great success and very well received.

In June I was hired to shoot an editorial for the September issue of FASHION Magazine, which is Canada’s leading fashion magazine. The editorial was titled “Team Spirit” and the theme for it was androgyny. It was a 10 page editorial and we shot in the ballroom of the historic King Edward Hotel in Toronto. The editorial featured two models, Alice Ma, represented by NEXT Models and David Chiang, represented by Ciotti Models, both in Toronto. Hair and makeup was by Susana Hong and the Fashion Director was George Antonopoulos. The editorial featured many top fashion brands including DSquared, Burberry, Vivienne Westwood, Gucci and Dries Van Noten.

Most of my work is photography, but I am also inspired by music videos and films, so over the past few years I have branched out in that direction. In 2013, I was hired to produce and direct and show package video for one of the top male modeling agencies in Toronto, Elite Model’s.

In one day, we shot nine different male models in the studio in front of a black background. The video was black and white and high contrast. I really enjoyed the editing process of the project and I was able to experiment and create with many different filters and effects. Even though the video is very different from my photography work, it was very popular and gained over ten thousand views online.


What has been your most memorable shoot?

PT: I would have to say that most memorable shoot would be the Elite Models video. It was a project where I had no restrictions or limits to what I could do. I was able to experiment with editing and effects and create something very bold and original. Also, it was great working with all of the models. Shooting photos can sometimes be tedious, but shooting this project was very exciting and enjoyable. It is probably the one project that has gotten me the most exposure.

What is inspiring you as a photographer now?

PT: It’s hard to say what inspires me now. My inspiration changes daily. At the moment I am really inspired to do shoots that are very dark and macabre. When the industry is moving into a more bright and fresh mood for Spring, my gut is telling me to go in the other direction.

Aside from the jobs that you are hired on to shoot, how would you describe your personal photography style?

PT: Captivating, dramatique, intense and unique. My main priority as a photographer and visual artist is to always be creating work that is original and reject the “norm.”

I always try to go against the grain and turn convention on its head. My most successful projects have been ones where I did something unexpected. I also enjoy experimenting with contrasting colours.

How much freedom do you have when it comes to creating the direction of a shoot for brands like Mac and Covergirl?  

PT: Unfortunately, with those two clients specifically, I don’t have much freedom. For Covergirl, the direction was very conservative and commercial. Basically, it was a standard beauty shoot. We shot a pretty model with 4 or 5 makeup looks. The lighting was very basic in order to show off the product.

Clients like Dean Davidson, Greta Constantine and Aveda are the ones that give me more creative control. I generally have no limits to how creative I can go with the direction for those shoots.

Do you have a specific area of interest or subjects that you prefer to focus on with your photography?

PT: Commercial. I like to focus on conceptual beauty and hair projects. I find that I can be more creative in that area than the standard fashion shoots.

For my creative work, I like focus on models or subjects that are unusual, bizarre and outside of the norm. I like photographing unique characters that don’t fit in the fashion industry’s molds.

How do you keep productive and retain your creative edge?

PT: I try to keep productive by always exposing myself to different and new experiences and people. I’m constantly researching new concepts and lightings. The best way I’ve been able to retain my creative edge is by always pushing myself to do what no one else is doing, being original and pushing boundaries.

What has been some of the best advice given to you by another photographer?

PT: The best advice I’ve received wasn’t actually from a photographer, but one of my best friends. When discussing what career path I should take, he said I should “do what I love.” It was really the catalyst for me to pursue photography professionally.

What special advice would you like to share with other photographers?

PT: Don’t follow trends.

Be original.

Do what makes you happy.

Who are some of your favorite photographers?

PT: David LaChappelle, Steven Klein, Mert & Marcus, Txema Yeste and Solve Sundsbo.

What equipment would we find in your camera bag or studio for a typical shoot?

PT: Generally, I shoot with a Canon 5d Mark II, my MacBook Pro, and a Profoto ComPact-R kit and lots of colour gels.

What lighting equipment do you favor and why?

PT: Profoto is the brand I learnt with and probably the most popular and versatile.

 

 

 

U.K. Model Axel Swan Maldini Poses in Exclusive Editorial ‘Lucha Libre’ for Fucking Young! Online

9_2
Axel Swan Maldini

 

Axel Swan Maldini, a valuable, highly sought out asset to the modeling industry and his talents were showcased throughout the editorial – “Lucha Libre” – for renowned fashion magazine, Fucking Young! Online.

Fucking Young! Online is a Barcelona-based menswear magazine featuring various campaigns, beauty, editorial, runway, and street style fashion. The platform features exclusive content and conversational interviews, a source its audience can count on for the latest news in fashion.

The exclusive editorial, “Lucha Libre,” featured leading models Axel Swan Maldini and Rasmus Nielsen Fisker.

“Lucha Libre was definitely dynamic,” Maldini said. “Poses were dynamic yet playful, contrasting the world of Lucha Libre with the world of Love.”

Photographed by Szilveszter Makó and styled with pieces from Barbara Sánchez-Kane, Maldini played an integral role as the starring model, his looks varying in nearly every photograph.

“Throughout the collection, Axel dawns various colorful and intricately designed clothing while sporting various Lucha Libre – Mexican style wrestling totems and items,” said stylist Sánchez-Kane, whose work is motivated by her Mexican heritage and has been featured in various fashion publications including Huf Magazine, Polimoda Mag, Positive Magazine.

At times throughout the shoot, Maldini’s face is completely covered in blue makeup, with cartoonishly drawn yet poignant lipstick on, accentuating a sad clown aesthetic.

“I was super excited when I got told I was going to be part of such a fun shoot,” Maldini said. “It was one of the most playful shoots I’ve done. Poses were switching between more static ones and some cheeky ones that recalled a playful erotism, as the typical Mexican wrestling wanted to be re-imagined by the designer. It definitely felt more like creating another persona. The clothes and the make-up made me interpret at best the concept of the shoot.”

Sánchez-Kane said, “Axel’s strengths as a model are unique when considering the expected features of a model. His naturally brooding look has a chilling effect; the most successful photos from the collection are of him staring directly into the camera, as if in a stand off with the view. His cold gaze, matched with his blue face highlights the inherent contrast between him as the subject, and what he is wearing as a model. The added presence of wresting paraphernalia, namely various wrestling masks and personalized wrestling belts, fixates Alex within a distinctly masculine lens, furthering the contrast of his expressions.”

After working together on “Lucha Libre,” Maldini and Sánchez-Kane collaborated again for the editorial shoot and press events of Sánchez-Kane’s presentation of “Catch as a Catch Can” at Villa Favard during Pitti Uomo in Florence, Italy.

“Axel’s collaborations with internationally renowned publications and brands, namely Catherinelle Bags, Cult Shoes, Papercut Magazine, and Lui Magazine, have proven that he is a natural talent in the fashion industry, but also more than capable of enhancing the meaning and tone of any editorial, shoot, or runway he involves himself with, I am thankful for our work together,” said Sánchez-Kane.

Behind the scenes: Cat Sherwin reveals a day in the life of a Make-up Artist and Hair Stylist on Australia’s leading breakfast TV news lineup

cat
Cat Sherwin

 

It’s 2 a.m. and her day has already begun.

A short meditation, double expresso and daily horoscope are the kick starters. Then it’s off to the shower, out the door and on to Seven Network Studios in the Martin Place district of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

The essential morning routine is the tried and true method for Cat Sherwin, make-up artist and hair stylist for Seven Network’s breakfast TV lineup: “Seven Early News,” “Sunrise” and “The Morning Show.”

“It’s my little bit of Zen time for day,” Sherwin said. “I find it really centers me with an aura of peace and calm for what’s often a hectic day ahead.”

Beginning with “Seven Early News,” followed by “Sunrise” and ending with “The Morning Show,” the three programs broadcast from 5 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. weekdays, with “Sunrise” continuing to air from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on weekends.

Programming informs Australian audiences on news, sports, weather, current affairs and entertainment. It’s an ongoing barrage of talk-show TV production that only pauses once a year, on Christmas Day.

Audiences have responded and made “Sunrise” the highest-rated breakfast news program across Australia. It originated in 1991 and is carried out in the tradition of “Good Morning America.”

“Sunrise” has covered a litany of major news including the Iraq War, the inauguration of Barack Obama, the 2010 Copiapo mining accident, the 2010-2011 Queenslands floods, the 2011 Christchurch earthquake, Hurricane Sandy, the 2014 Sydney hostage crisis, the Pope’s morning Masses and many other impactful stories. Musical guests on “Sunrise” have included Usher, Justin Bieber, Lady Gaga, Katy Perry, One Direction, and dozens more.

For Sherwin, her schedule varies and includes make-up and hair styling up to five out of seven days a week at the studio where she participates critically for the production of all three morning shows. She’s been making up and styling show hosts and guests for Seven Network’s morning lineup since 2008, an impressive tenure that’s featured her outstanding work in hundreds of episodes.

“The wide variety of show types offer a huge opportunity for different creativity and experiences,” said Sherwin, who estimates she styles around 5-15 different people per episode. “News has to be often quite structured and serious. Entertainment and weather presenters can be a little more fun and fashion forward. Current affairs programs are often tailored to the nature of the interview.”

“Seven Early News” is presented by Jodie Speers. “Sunrise” is hosted by David Koch and Samantha Armytage. Also hosting “Sunrise” are Natalie Barr (news), Mark Beretta (sports), Edwina Bartholomew (Entertainment) and Sam Mac (weather). “The Morning Show” is presented by Kylie Gilles and Larry Emdur.

“All main hosts are styled first before we move on to guests. We look at the wardrobe of the presenter for the day and any accessories they may have, and also take into account any particular requests the host may have, or a particular look they may want to go for that day,” said Sherwin. “Each makeup artist is given a main host to style, hair, make-up, hair extensions, lashes, then often a male host as well.”

As to guests and interviewees, Sherwin has made up a wide array of people from all walks of life, from abuse and disaster victims, to brides wanting to get married on TV, to rock stars, writers, actors, directors and many more. She’s styled Duran Duran, author Deepak Chopra and actress/model Teresa Palmer, to name a few.

Sherwin has styled for the show’s coverage of the Melbourne Cup and an Opera House concert with Katy Perry. She’s made up the needed looks for on location shoots in any elements, whether rain, cold, heat or any other challenging conditions.

Just before a guest appears on a show segment, Sherwin’s styling duties actually add a psychological component.

“You’re often one of the last interfaces before a person goes on air and if it is a guest who has never been on television before, they can be nervous,” she explained. “I believe it’s my job to help keep people calm and make everyone feel special, whilst also making them feel and look great – often in a short amount of time.”

The reality of Sherwin’s job requires a world of talent, creativity and poise under pressure. She strikes an imperative balance of keeping calm and centered, while also being upbeat and energetic. The nuances are necessities when considering the importance of her behind-the-camera role.

“Your work is extremely visible on the show for the world to see,” she said. “There’s nowhere to hide. You have to get it right whilst also not taking yourself too seriously or getting stressed. It’s also a lot of shift work, so it’s important to look after yourself physically and mentally.”

Sonya Downie is Seven Network’s Chief Departmental Head for Hair and Make-Up and has worked in supervisory production roles for more than 20 years.

“Cat’s work is superb. I have now worked with her for eight or nine years and her work consistently shines,” said Downie. “Cat is a wonderful, dedicated and extraordinary artist, recognized not only for her amazing creative skills, but her professionalism and integrity in the workplace. She is a joy to work with and inspiration to all those who work with her, making her a key choice for our top talent.”

After each morning show has commenced at Seven Network Studios, Sherwin wraps up by washing brushes, restocking product, organizing her kit, returning calls, e-mailing, invoicing and researching different looks for the next morning’s productions.

Upon returning home, she lays out her clothes for the next day and prepares breakfast to take on the go. Another 2 a.m. rise beckons. It’s Zen time once again. And Sherwin wouldn’t have it any other way.

“It’s definitely a buzz and fabulous to be part of such a big show renowned across Australia,” she said. “It sometimes blows me away how many people watch and have seen me on behind the scenes shots. Often audience members will call and ask what lipstick or blush we have used. It’s amazing that we can influence viewers’ make-up choices and how many people take an interest in what the hosts’ style is for the day. Television is a visual medium after all.”

Model Bautista Zorio Munoz and Photographer Diego Fierce Deliver for Fashion Editorial Features

IMG_0023

Spanish model Bautista Zorio Munoz and Mexican photographer Diego Fierce teamed up to create a heavy-hitting one-two punch for fashion editorial features. The collaboration brought together two extraordinary talents – who are both atop their crafts and industries – and who deliver awe-inspiring photographic brilliance.

“I always take a strong personal interest in the models I work with, and I have been very gratified to see Bautista’s career take off over the past several years,” said Fierce.

Munoz says, “Diego is certainly a go-to photographer in the business and I’ve always come away impressed and elated in working with him. He’s a photographer who knows how to get the best out of his shooting subjects and we’ve completed some incredible work together.”

A native of Valencia, Spain, Munoz has firmly supplanted himself as a debonair male model of international commendation. He has graced the covers of Minus10 Magazine and Fantastics, modeled for campaigns for Tommy Hilfiger and Abercrombie & Fitch, and been featured as a leading model for editorials published in fashion magazines such as GQ Mexico, Caleo (Germany), Rocket, Coast, Agenda, Adon and more.

The widely achieved and celebrated Fierce has shot cover images and editorials for premium lifestyle magazines such as Ene (Mexico), HUF (U.K.) Minus10 (U.S.) and others.

Munoz and Fierce worked together on an editorial feature for Rocket magazine, a prominent men’s fashion publication headquartered in Barcelona. The feature concentrated on an athletic theme that immersed Muñoz in a modeling portrayal of a schoolboy soccer player.

“In the editorial, Bautista provided a knockout performance that was sensual, confident and very memorable,” Fierce said. “He was a natural at delivering strong poses and expressions that suggested everything from a cocky playboy attitude to that of a moody, passionate lover. He also did a brilliant job of modeling the nautical-style shirts and shorts selected for the feature, making them all look quite stylish.”

Munoz said, “The shoot was exciting and fun. The soccer theme was something that came together really well and I think we did a nice job in bringing this feature to life in a very intriguing way for the magazine.”

Munoz’ breathtaking appearance was pronounced by his muscular torso and raw, handsome physical features. But the remarkable work came together too because of Munoz’ refined ability to create exhilarating drama within the imagery.

“Bautista absolutely embodies these qualities, and infused every photo with a strong sense of emotion that set him and his work far above many of his peers,” said Fierce.

The dynamic duo again collaborated on a cover editorial feature called “Perfect Confidence” for Minus10 magazine.

“He excelled at transitioning through the many distinct outfits and looks we had prepared for him, which ranged from underwear to sports jerseys to stylish suit jackets and leather boots,” said Fierce. “Bautista always knew how to model each item of clothing in order to draw out its most attractive qualities, and played the part of a classy urban gentleman just as easily as that of a sporty athlete.”

Of Munoz’ visual presence, Fierce said, “Bautista’s rich black hair and dark smoldering features were especially vital to the look we wanted for the projected, as they contrasted beautifully with the array of light and dark pieces we chose for him.”

Represented by TWO Management (Los Angeles), NEVS (London), Paragon Models (Mexico City) and Francina Models (Spain), Munoz’ portfolio can be seen here: http://www.twomanagement.com/portfolio.aspx?nav=&subid=11653&mainsubid=11653&modelid=714762&sexid=1&a=7

Follow Bautista on Instagram:
@bautistazorio

UK Artist Katie Bright’s “Pre-Love Past Loves”Lights Up New York’s Melrose Ballroom

Showgirls_by_Kaliisa Conlon
Katie Bright in one of her hand made wolf garments in “Showgirls” shot by Kaliisa Conlon

 

There is an “art” that comes with fashion, be it style or design, which is why the transition from fashion to art was a smooth one for creative mastermind and performer Katie Bright, also known by her artist name, Miss BrightSide. The extraordinary artist recently held a runway performance exhibiting her art pieces at New York’s Melrose Ballroom entitled “Pre-loved Past Loves.”

The show consisted of 7 models, starring Miss Brightside herself, all dolled up and sporting unique dresses each constructed with various soft, plush fur-like, wolf mask designs, all hand sewn and crafted by the artist. Each unique mask represents Miss Brightside’s previous lovers and conveys her love for fantasy, play and storytelling.

The British born, 36 year old artist originally graduated with a B.A. in Fashion, and designed for major Italian fashion brand United Colors of Benetton, as well as celebrated Australian fashion designer Akira Isogawa, whose fashion designs are displayed at Sydney’s Powerhouse Museum.

“Over the years most of the fashion collections I have created have been transmuted from work seen in galleries. Whether it was a colour palette from a painting or clothing informed by a sculpture,” says Bright regarding her designs, which were inspired by other art works.

Bright’s fixation and zeal for art led to her evolution as a visual artist and performer. In 2012, she decided to put together her first solo exhibit “My Fairytale Perspective on Love” with aMBUSH gallery, which was a sensation with over 1,000 supporters. Bright’s phenomenal success confirmed her footprint in the art world and allowed her to pursue her Masters in Fine Art at the esteemed Central Saint Martins in London. The renowned art and design school is known for such distinguished alumni as designer and “Project Runway” judge Zac Posen, singer -songwriter PJ Harvey, rapper MIA, artist Lee Wagstaff, and the illustrious designer Alexander McQueen.

Reminiscent of prominent artists such as Andy Warhol and Banksy, Brightside utilizes iconography and visual imagery to express her message in her art work. She says, “I would describe myself as a performance and installation artist interested in iconography, Hollywood, fairytales and feminine representation.”

However, for Brightside, it’s the subject matter of scopophilia (the pleasure or love of looking) that is near and dear to her heart as scopophilia is the driving force behind most of her art pieces, with the female, in this case iconic Disney characters such as Minnie Mouse, Aerial the mermaid, and Jessica Rabbit, as the objects of desire that are being gazed upon.

Throughout her first exhibit, Brightside used a screen printing technique, applying her prints onto a mirror, to reflect her enchanted, fairytale theme. The artist’s explanation was that, “I would hope the audience could entertain the position of a voyeur or scopophiliac. There is also the view that through my journey the observer could interpret their position of being a woman.”

The visual artist continues to play with iconic imagery and the topic of scopophilia by pushing the subject to new boundaries as Miss Brightside opened her latest New York art performance by coming out to the classic song “I Want to Be Loved by You” by Marilyn Monroe (from the Oscar nominated picture Some Like It Hot), wearing a white wedding dress, along with a blonde short wig, to personify the Hollywood legend.

Check out the live performance below:

“I believe Marilyn Monroe developed a formula. Famous for the bleach blonde hair, Nike ‘swoosh’ eyebrows, a full red lip pout and that iconic mole. Monroe’s ‘perfecting oneself’ beauty regime has been reproduced over the decades; whether blonde or brunette, we all accentuate what God gave us, and for some, to the point of becoming unrecognizable to our own mothers, ” says Bright, who intends to develop a full series of work on the voluptuous icon.

Aside from taking the art world by storm, Miss Brightside also has her designs set to premier this summer at the Surftides Lincoln City Hotel in Oregon, and at Tart Restaurant and Farmer’s Daughter Hotel in Los Angeles. She’s also currently organizing her third art exhibit entitled “Preloved II,” and if her show is anything like her first exhibit Miss Brightside will be sure to make room for new art, and fashion, enthusiasts alike.

A Look at Leading Fashion Photographer Adina Doria and Ivy Levan!

A Canadian citizen who was originally born in Belgium, Miss Adina Doria has travelled the world with a camera since she was three-years-old. Through photography Adina Doria has been able to communicate that which is often incommunicable through words. Doria, who is currently working as a lead photographer for Sinko Branding in Los Angeles, has shot some of the world’s hottest fashion campaigns. Her work has been featured in magazines including Germany’s Huff magazine, Milan’s Trent Prive, LA Fashion Magazine, and countless others.

With her unique vision and unparalleled creativity, Doria’s photographs have provided a spotlight for many models in a way that has led them to great success.

Doria’s work with Ivy Levan depicts the well-known model, musician and actress as a luscious bombshell in a series of photographs that are so striking it is simply impossible for viewers to take their eyes off of her.  When it comes to lighting, Doria uses her artistry to capture Levan’s fierce sexuality in a way that is both cinematic and provocative.

While Levan is undoubtedly breathtaking in each photograph, the way Doria poses her model and incorporates various lighting techniques in accordance with the model’s wardrobe and make-up is a testament to her unrivalled artistic vision.

For example, in the shots where Levan is dressed like a futuristic dominatrix, Doria uses the perfect hint of blue lighting to capture her subject in a way that makes her look like a fierce ice queen. Doria’s use of subtle red lighting in the background of the shots where we see Levan dressed in 50’s-esque pinup lingerie holding a long bone cigarette holder is the perfect compliment to Levan’s blood red lipstick and sultry stare.

Aside from her incredible use of light and impeccable eye, Adina Doria is a magician when it comes to getting the shot. She has a way of accessing her subjects most photogenic angles within seconds of meeting them, a trait which not only makes her one of the best of photographers in the world, but one of the most sought after in the fashion industry.

 

Ivy Levan shot by Adina DoriaIvy_levan_adina_doria_07
Ivy_levan_adina_doria_06
Ivy_levan_adina_doria_11